TripAdvisor Review

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We have joined forces with TripAdvisor for your travel needs. Read reviews on Restaurants. ParsiCuisine.com Books available on Amazon Manna of the 21st Century: Parsi Cuisine Paperback https://www.amazon.com/dp/1090868391 Hardcover https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0962FML7W Indian Parsi Kitchen https://www.amazon.com/dp/1535410132 Celebrations: Celebrating Zoroastrian Festivals and Traditions https://www.amazon.com/dp/152381845X Dhansak: Parsi Cuisine https://amzn.to/4d92fuv

The place of Tea in Indian Culture

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The place of Tea in Indian Culture

Indians love tea, they are crazy about it – and they even have a special word for it – chai.
India is one of the largest tea growers in the world. Tea is grown in the north and the south – in exotic places like Munnar in Kerala, Darjeeling, Assam, and Nilgiri Mountains. The tea gardens are a sight to see. Beautiful terraces are carved into the earth and from far they look like manicured gardens. Tea from Darjeeling and Assam is world famous for its aroma and taste.
Tea was introduced in India by the British during early 1900’s, those were early days of the British Raj. Large swaths of land were converted for mass tea-production. Ironically, the British introduced tea in India to break the Chinese monopoly. Tea was originally consumed by the westernized Indians, but it became widely popular over time. Today, looking at the popularity of tea one cannot tell of its origins from China.
But the story of story of tea in India goes beyond the tea gardens in exotic mountains and valleys, covered with mist and lush greenery. Tea is woven intricately into the Indian social fabric.
Chai is the common equalizer in India – from the rich to the poor. No matter what their position in life, an Indian relishes a cup of tea. The rich ones have their tea served in fancy tea-pots, delicate porcelain cups on well laid out tables with cookies and pastries. The not-so-affluent have it in more humble settings. But the joy and satisfaction is the same.
No matter where you go in India, even the remote village, you are likely to find a tea-stall, with a Chai-walla brewing the concoction, squeezing every last flavor. There is always a crowd of eager and tired folks waiting patiently for their chai. Tea re-vitalizes your body. It is a great anti-oxidant.
India has one of the largest railway networks in the world. Every train station has tea-stalls. Hawkers carry tea-buckets doling out hot cups to weary travelers as the trains pull into the train stations. One of my enduring memories growing up in India is traveling on the train in the sleeper-coach and waking up to the lilting calls of the tea-hawkers.
There are many stories of how tea brings people together. When you visit friends – tea and snacks are probably the most common offering. A cup of tea bonds friendships and heals differences. A guest rejecting an offer of a cup of tea may even hurt their feelings. The ultimate bonding is sharing a cup of tea – between two people – albeit in different saucers. When you visit a commercial establishment, as a sign of respect for the customer, tea is offered. Read more in my cookbook for Tea.
Recently, I was invited to speak and present “The Place of Tea in Indian Culture and the Kerala Tea Gardens” at the Boston Athenaeum. Here is a short synopsis. I am delighted that my Cookbooks were displayed and showcased in the museum! Thanks Hannah Weisman! Hannah is the Director of Education at Boston Athenaeum.
The museum is a historical place and encourages historical books. The Boston Athenaeum is steeped in history. Founded in 1807, the Boston Athenæum is one of the oldest and most distinguished independent libraries and cultural institutions in the United States.
Tea / Chai Recipes:
Ginger Tea
Masala Chai
Parsi Chai
Cardamom Tea
Teas of India Cookbook

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Ravo

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Fish wrapped in Banana Leaf with delicious Chutney: Parsi Patra ni Maachi

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Navroze Celebrations – a video by PARZOR

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ParsiCuisine.com Books available on Amazon Manna of the 21st Century: Parsi Cuisine Paperback https://www.amazon.com/dp/1090868391 Hardcover https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0962FML7W Indian Parsi Kitchen https://www.amazon.com/dp/1535410132 Celebrations: Celebrating Zoroastrian Festivals and Traditions https://www.amazon.com/dp/152381845X Dhansak: Parsi Cuisine https://amzn.to/4d92fuv

Happy Republic Day to all in India

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Happy Republic Day to all in India

150 Year’s Old Dorabjee & sons

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PUNE का सबसे पेहला PARSI Restaurant | 150 Year’s Old Dorabjee & sons RESTAURANT | Pune Food Tour Contact number – Dores Dorabji 98230 54547 Google location -https://maps.app.goo.gl/pciACrjx3dLvc8qR7?g_st=ic Address -845, Dastur Meher Road, Sharbat Wala, Chowk, Pune, Maharashtra 411001 ParsiCuisine.com Books available on Amazon Manna of the 21st Century: Parsi Cuisine Paperback https://www.amazon.com/dp/1090868391 Hardcover https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0962FML7W […]

Sali Par Edu (Eggs with shredded fried potatoes)

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Grated deep fried potatoes topped with eggs, sunny side up. An easy to make Parsi breakfast dish. by Chef Dharmendar, Mocha, New Delhi Ingredients 3 eggs2 tsp olive oil4 Tbsp Sali (Sali is available in the market or you can make these at home by deep frying partially boiled grated potatoes.) Salt and pepper, to taste […]

TANAZ GODIWALLA PICKLE IN NORTH AMERICA

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Tanaz Godiwalla

Dotivala Bakery

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Dotivala The ‘Batasas’ Family of Surat UpperCrust visits Dotivala, Surat’s oldest bakery, which is known all over India for its Batasas, Nankhatais and Khari biscuits. WHATEVER you do in Surat, you cannot come away without buying Nankhatai, Batasas and Khari biscuits from the old Dotivala bakery there. It is located on Ardeshir Kotwal Road, Nanpura, […]

Udvada Bakers

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Baked with love! ParsiCuisine.com Books available on Amazon Manna of the 21st Century: Parsi Cuisine Paperback https://www.amazon.com/dp/1090868391 Hardcover https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0962FML7W Indian Parsi Kitchen https://www.amazon.com/dp/1535410132 Celebrations: Celebrating Zoroastrian Festivals and Traditions https://www.amazon.com/dp/152381845X Dhansak: Parsi Cuisine https://amzn.to/4d92fuv

Kalaghoda Malido Cafe

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Kalaghoda Malido Cafe

Independence Day and the Parsi connection

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Believe it or not toad in the hole dish was relished for breakfast India when the British Raj was active.  Yes, Parsis liked to eat British fare, specially during the pre-independence days before 1947. Toad in the hole may sound strange to the average person and even more foreign to Gen Z, but in some British communities […]

The Batasa Story – Jamshed & Cyrus Dotivala

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Recipe of Batasa Is it true that the Dotivala family invented the famous Parsi Batasa ? How and when did this come about? Yes, our forefathers were the inventors of the famous tea time biscuit popularly known as Batasa. It was in the early 1800’s when our forefather Mr. Faramji Pestonji Dotivala joined the Dutch […]

Stum Food in the Muktads and Gatha days explained from Udvada

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By Marzban Hathiram Today’s afternoon Stum – Goan potato curry with basmati rice and kachumber – a lightly tossed onion, cucumber and carrot salad with coriander leaves; some pomegranate seeds, cow’s milk, a rose and freshly drawn well water… Bon apetit! There is deep spiritual significance behind each of these offerings as they represent the […]