Parsi Lamb tender and tasty with baby potatoes.

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“Has anyone cooked with Costco Australian Lamb? I have tried making sali botti, biryani with it but each time it comes out with a almost dark color and tough. Is it my masala or what! Using adoo lasan (ginger garlic ) to marinate. Any tips to keep the meat light colored and tender?”

The response I got was so nice! People do help out with tips ! Thank you everone on PER and ParsiCuisine group.

Falsa Drink

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Falsa is commonly known as phalsa or falsa, is a species of flowering plant in the mallow family Malvaceae. It was first found in Varanasi, India, and was taken by Buddhist scholars to other Asian countries including Pakistan and the rest of the world. Wikipedia Falsa are full of iron. Falsa drink is easy to make. […]

The place of Tea in Indian Culture

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The place of Tea in Indian Culture

Indians love tea, they are crazy about it – and they even have a special word for it – chai.
India is one of the largest tea growers in the world. Tea is grown in the north and the south – in exotic places like Munnar in Kerala, Darjeeling, Assam, and Nilgiri Mountains. The tea gardens are a sight to see. Beautiful terraces are carved into the earth and from far they look like manicured gardens. Tea from Darjeeling and Assam is world famous for its aroma and taste.
Tea was introduced in India by the British during early 1900’s, those were early days of the British Raj. Large swaths of land were converted for mass tea-production. Ironically, the British introduced tea in India to break the Chinese monopoly. Tea was originally consumed by the westernized Indians, but it became widely popular over time. Today, looking at the popularity of tea one cannot tell of its origins from China.
But the story of story of tea in India goes beyond the tea gardens in exotic mountains and valleys, covered with mist and lush greenery. Tea is woven intricately into the Indian social fabric.
Chai is the common equalizer in India – from the rich to the poor. No matter what their position in life, an Indian relishes a cup of tea. The rich ones have their tea served in fancy tea-pots, delicate porcelain cups on well laid out tables with cookies and pastries. The not-so-affluent have it in more humble settings. But the joy and satisfaction is the same.
No matter where you go in India, even the remote village, you are likely to find a tea-stall, with a Chai-walla brewing the concoction, squeezing every last flavor. There is always a crowd of eager and tired folks waiting patiently for their chai. Tea re-vitalizes your body. It is a great anti-oxidant.
India has one of the largest railway networks in the world. Every train station has tea-stalls. Hawkers carry tea-buckets doling out hot cups to weary travelers as the trains pull into the train stations. One of my enduring memories growing up in India is traveling on the train in the sleeper-coach and waking up to the lilting calls of the tea-hawkers.
There are many stories of how tea brings people together. When you visit friends – tea and snacks are probably the most common offering. A cup of tea bonds friendships and heals differences. A guest rejecting an offer of a cup of tea may even hurt their feelings. The ultimate bonding is sharing a cup of tea – between two people – albeit in different saucers. When you visit a commercial establishment, as a sign of respect for the customer, tea is offered. Read more in my cookbook for Tea.
Recently, I was invited to speak and present “The Place of Tea in Indian Culture and the Kerala Tea Gardens” at the Boston Athenaeum. Here is a short synopsis. I am delighted that my Cookbooks were displayed and showcased in the museum! Thanks Hannah Weisman! Hannah is the Director of Education at Boston Athenaeum.
The museum is a historical place and encourages historical books. The Boston Athenaeum is steeped in history. Founded in 1807, the Boston Athenæum is one of the oldest and most distinguished independent libraries and cultural institutions in the United States.
Tea / Chai Recipes:
Ginger Tea
Masala Chai
Parsi Chai
Cardamom Tea
Teas of India Cookbook

More on The place of Tea in Indian Culture on ParsiCuisine.com

Famous Parsi Fish with Green Chutney, Patra ni Machhi

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A very popular recipe of the Parsi Cuisine. Patra ni Machhi Recipe Ingredients 4 banana leaves 1 kg fish Juice of 1 lemon 3/4 tsp salt Chutney: 1 grated coconut 6 green chillies 50 gm coriander leaves with stems 1 tbsp mint leaves 1 tsp ground cumin seeds 1 tsp sugar Salt to taste Combine […]

Tamarind Chutney

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Amli Chutney aka Tamarind Chutney Amli is Tamarind a fruit, combined with spiced apple butter makes a tasty Chutney. A very popular indian chutney served in restarants. Easy to make with just 2 ingredients.  From the cookbook Manna of the 21st Century Parsi Cuisine by Rita Jamshed Kapadia. Available on Amazon.com in paperback or hard […]

Bombil, Boomla or Bombay Duck

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Bombil, Boomla or Bombay Duck

Gos-no-kharo Ras Chaval with Khatti Mithi Kachumbar

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Ingredients1 kg tender Goat Mutton, Chicken or Lamb – cut into medium pieces, washed & left to drain in colander6 large onions – chopped very fine (cut like chhudna no kando)4 tomatoes – again chopped very fine (tamota)4 Potatoes – cut into 2 halves (papeta)8-10 pods of garlic (lasan)1.5″ piece of ginger (aadu)6-8 green chillies […]

Parsi Kitchen Nostalgia – A Trip Down The Food-Memory Lane

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by Dara Khodaiji Our love for food is legendary! The way to the Parsi/Irani heart is definitely through the stomach, gender immaterial! No occasion is complete without good food. And as much as we love attending functions and events, it’s the “kaun nu catering chhe?” that forms the larger part of the decision. PT Writer […]

Ravo

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Parsi Ravo Recipe

Healthy Patrani Machchi

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  A healthy Patra-Ni-Machchi recipe, only with some mustard oil to give flavor. Pomfret wrapped in a tangy marinade and steamed in a banana leaf. Ingredients 1 fresh pomfret (medium sized)Banana leaves For Marinade: 4 Tbsp curd 1/2 Tbsp turmeric Some chopped garlic 1 1/2 Tbsp mustard oil Chilli flakes 1/2 Tbsp salt Half lemon, […]

Patra Fish

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Patrani machi is a Parsi steamed fish preparation. Fish coated in a coconut chutney mixture, wrapped in banana leaf and steamed. https://youtu.be/8ymliZBw7QU Ingredients 4 banana leaves 1 kg fish Juice of 1 lemon 3/4 tsp salt Chutney: 1 grated coconut 6 green chillies 50 gm coriander leaves with stems 1 tbsp mint leaves 1 tsp […]

Fish wrapped in Banana Leaf with delicious Chutney: Parsi Patra ni Maachi

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Fish wrapped in Banana Leaf with delicious Chutney: Parsi Patra ni Maachi

Bhakhra (Fried Cakes)

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http://www.parsicuisine.com/bhakhra/

A Parsi Story: Sugar in the Milk

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I would like to take you on a journey into the culture, and nuances of the Parsi Cuisine of India. I would like to present to you the famous Story of Parsi immigration (into India) and their welcome with “Sugar in the Milk”. One of the oldest stories of Sugar and Milk in Parsis (Parsi / […]

Whale

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Whale of a  Sev ni boi. Made with Sev, Vanilla, Sugar and decorated with Almonds, Raisins and Pistachios. Who can spot the diamond ring in the fish (boi)? ParsiCuisine.com Books available on Amazon Manna of the 21st Century: Parsi Cuisine Paperback https://www.amazon.com/dp/1090868391 Hardcover https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0962FML7W Indian Parsi Kitchen https://www.amazon.com/dp/1535410132 Celebrations: Celebrating Zoroastrian Festivals and Traditions https://www.amazon.com/dp/152381845X […]