Run Chicken run !

Bahman mahino is over!
Chicken and other meat recipes are at http://www.parsicuisine.com/Recipes/recipes/meats/

Check off the squares!

Are you an authentic Parsi?

Check off the squares!

Let us know your comments below. 🙂

Food for the Mind

Today’s Humor – Cake of the times

Cake of the Year
Cake of the Year

Cake of the Year

BAWATIPS: Tips for a Majja Ni Life

Kolmi no Patio

by BawaTips and Parsi Khabar

Nice one – so good had to share!

Nice one - so good had to share! "Patio" is a outdoor sitting area and a yummy parsi tomato based sauce to be enjoyed ! How about having the "Parsi Patio" with "Dhan Dar" on a warm sunny deck (patio). Of the wierd shrimps love basking in the sunshine and look like aliens!!!
Nice one – so good had to share! “Patio” is a outdoor sitting area and a yummy parsi tomato based sauce to be enjoyed ! How about having the “Parsi Patio” with “Dhan Dar” on a warm sunny deck (patio). Of the wierd shrimps love basking in the sunshine and look like aliens!!!

“Patio” is a outdoor sitting area and a yummy parsi tomato based sauce to be enjoyed !

How about having the “Parsi Patio” with “Dhan Dar” on a warm sunny deck (patio).

Of course the wierd shrimps love basking in the sunshine and look like aliens!!!


BAWATIPS: Tips for a Majja Ni Life

Mumbai owes a lot to the Parsi community be it the far sightedness of its visionary thinkers. or their benevolence that helped set up some of the city’s most well-known landmarks, educational and health institutions. In the same breath, the community is also known and loved for its quirky and ‘ unique sense of humor.

Celebrating this, is an interesting venture set up by 22-year-olds Hormuz Bana and Viktor Daruwala. The young duo have set up Bawatips, a social net­working community that acts as a platform to post funny one-liners that are typical to the Parsis. It became a hit with the community as well as others. Today, the page boasts of over 7,COO likes.

“It started one night when Viktor called me up after a drinking session at a local bar and said that like the brotips (by the famous character Barney Stinson, from the TV series How I Met your Mother) we should start something like Bawatips that shares everything about a bawa. So, next morning we came up with ten lines and Started the community,” says Hormuz. The background of their posts has clinking beer mugs as an ode to a Parsi’s love for alcohol. Even the font has been chosen after much deliberation. “We prefer to think that the bawas aren’t a dwin­dling community, but just few in number. Hence, we use the Futura font by which we mean that there is a future,” he adds.

‘When we say, ‘I phone’ we mean ‘this’ phone, you idiot’ and ‘Leave the mustard, try lagan nu custard’ are a few funny examples that otic will come across while browsing the page. Then again, many of their lines also use foul language. Quiz them about the elders getting upset about the use of such language, and Hormuz rea­sons, “It is common with the community, and though, some at first might not have liked it. others took it in jest and understood that we aren’t out there to make a mockery of any­one.” They wanted to post their thoughts in a fun way without hurting anyone’s sentiments — religious or otherwise. Bana, who also doubles as a priest takes care of this aspect.

“We never expected it to get this popular. So. we fell tliat the best way to take this further would be to print some of the quirkiest quotes on tees. Between 30 to 40 percent of our buy­ers were non-Parsis. They had Parsi friends and connected the tips with their cTaziness.”shares Bana.

LOG ON TO www.facebook.com/bawatips

CALL + 91 9819816262

EMAIL bawatips@gmail.com

COST: Rs 350

Food for the Mind

I boarded flight from Bangalore to Mumbai, economy class. I put my hand bag in overhead bin and took my aisle seat. There was an old person sitting next to me on the window seat.
I had a presentation in Mumbai, so took my documents and started going through them for the final time before the presentation. After 15–20 minutes I was done with my documents, so I put them away and started looking out of the window, and suddenly I looked at the face of this person sitting next to me. I thought I have seen him somewhere.

He was old, his face, the suit was not very expensive, and he was replying to some mails or going through some documents. I exactly don’t know. I noticed his shoes, they were average quality.
Something stuck me and I asked him:
*“Are you Mr. Narayana Murthy?”*

He looked at me, smiled and replied, *“Yes, I am.”*

I was shocked !
For one second I had no idea what to say next. I looked at him again. His shoes, his suit, his tie and his specs. Everything was average. This guy was worth $2.3 Billion and co-founded Infosys.
I always wanted to become super rich so that I can buy all the luxury and travel business class. He could buy the whole airlines and yet he was sitting next to me in economy class!

I again asked: *“Why are you travelling in economy class and not business class?”*

He replied:
*“Do Business class people reach early?”*

And then introduced myself, “Hello sir! My name is Mayank Gupta and I am a freelance corporate trainer and I work with many MNCs PAN India.”

He then put his phone away and started listening to me, he also asked few questions and answered the questions I asked. We both went down deep into the conversation until I asked a question which was about to change my life entirely.
I questioned:
*Sir, You are so successful and have made so many good decisions in your life. Is there something you regret?”*

He got intense look on his face, thought for a while and answered,
*“Sometimes my knee hurts, I should have taken better care of my body. When I was young I was so busy working that I never got time to take care of myself and now even if I want to work more, I can’t. My body doesn’t permit.”*
*“You are young. You are smart and ambitious but don’t repeat the mistake I made. Take proper care of your body and take proper rest. This is the only body you have got!”*

That day I learned two things, one that he told me and another that he showed me!

Being rich is not about owning things.
I had got what I needed.
What a great and down to earth human being he is, no doubt he is so successful! Thought to share this forward message. Nice reflection of success with values and great learning from a humble human being .

An insightful message to every one👆

http://www.parsicuisine.com/dedicated-to-all-chicken-lovers/

Dedicated to all chicken lovers

Chicken vocabulary 🐓

  1. Who is the chicken’s father?
    Chicken ka bab.
  2. Who is the chicken’s mother?
    Chicken Kima.
  3. How do you tell a chicken to call you on your mobile?
    Kalmi chicken
  4. What happens when a chicken takes a bath?
    Chicken showerma.
  5. Chicken in trouble?
    Chicken soup.
  6. Chicken getting injection?
    Chicken teeka.
  7. Chicken flatterer?
    Butter chicken.
  8. Chicken on a winter night?
    Chilly chicken.
  9. Chicken @ retirement?
    Chicken 65.

Dedicated to all chicken lovers

DEDICATED TO ALL CHICKEN LOVERS "BAK BAK"
CHICKEN VOCABULARY 🐓

WHO IS THE CHICKEN’S FATHER?
CHICKEN KA BAB.

WHO IS THE CHICKEN’S MOTHER?
CHICKEN KIMA.

HOW DO YOU TELL A CHICKEN TO CALL YOU ON YOUR MOBILE?
KALMI CHICKEN

WHAT HAPPENS WHEN A CHICKEN TAKES A BATH?
CHICKEN SHOWERMA.

CHICKEN IN TROUBLE?
CHICKEN SOUP.
CHICKEN GETTING INJECTION?
CHICKEN TEEKA.

CHICKEN FLATTERER?
BUTTER CHICKEN.

CHICKEN ON A WINTER NIGHT?
CHILLY CHICKEN.

CHICKEN @ RETIREMENT?
CHICKEN 65.
IF YOU LIKE THIS FOOD HUMOR, LET US KNOW SO WE CAN BRING MORE TO YOU :-)
Email us at webmaster@parsicusine.com

Full post at - http://www.parsicuisine.com/dedicated-to-all-chicken-lovers/

#parsicuisine #parsifood #eggs #humor #vocabulary
IF YOU LIKE THIS FOOD HUMOR, LET US KNOW SO WE CAN BRING MORE TO YOU 🙂
Email us at webmaster@parsicusine.com
IF YOU LIKE THIS FOOD HUMOR, LET US KNOW SO WE CAN BRING MORE TO YOU :-)
 Email us at webmaster@parsicusine.com
IF YOU LIKE THIS FOOD HUMOR, LET US KNOW SO WE CAN BRING MORE TO YOU 🙂
Email us at webmaster@parsicusine.com
Kid Cooks Wanted!

Kid Cooks Wanted!

ParsiCuisine.com invites kids of all ages — from the littlest to college students — to submit their recipes, stories about their efforts, and photos of their creations for possible publication in our column  The Kids Cook We can’t promise that all submissions will be accepted for publication, but we do promise that each submission will receive a prompt and encouraging reply from one of our staff. 
Get your kids cooking! We’d love to hear from them!

When you ask your husband to put the food away

Nankhatai Homemade, Wholesome and Authentic

What do Nankhatai Biscuits and Nankhatai Band have in common?

What do Nankhatai Biscuits & Nankhatai Band have in common?

Answer: Both Biscuit and Band were popular in Surat, India.

The soft crumbly nankhatai brings back many a fond memory. The word Nankhatai comes from the Persian word ‘Nan‘ meaning bread and ‘Khatai’ probably comes from ‘Catai’ or ‘Cathay’, the older name for China. Thus translating as ‘Bread of Cathay’. Another version from Northeast Iran / Afganistan is that Khatai is a type of biscuit, also referred to as Kulcha-e-namaki.

These cookies originated in Gujarat, where they are especially popular with Parsis. Surat and Navsari, strongholds of traditional Parsi culture have local mithai shops that make these.

Nankhatai Band

In western India, Mumbai (—Bombay), Poona, parts of Gujarat festive processions will often be accompanied by musicians known popularly as nankhatai bands, possibly because some of the bands may have originally been made up of moonlighting bakers and vendors of nankhatai.

The tunes they played were

“Its a Long Way to Tipperary”,

“Marching through Georgia”

” My Bonnie Lies over the Ocean”

“Pistol-Packing Mama”

“Swanee River” and, in the 1960s, the immensely popular theme from the film “Come September”,

all played slightly off-key with lots of percussion and brass and comic opera uniforms. Nowadays, although the instruments and costumes are the same, the tunes are all drawn from current Hindi film hits.

Note: Anyone have the tunes? Videos? Would like to post them here.


Some more Nankhatai facts:

Dotivala bakery in Surat

The history of the nankhatai in India is quite interesting. Towards the end of the 16th century, a couple of Dutch dudes set up a bakery in Surat to cater to the needs of the local Dutch populace. When the Dutch were leaving India, the bakery owners handed over the bakery to a very enterprising employee of theirs, a Parsi gentleman by the name Faramji Pestonji Dotivala. After the Dutch left; because the bread was made with palm toddy for fermentation, it didn’t find  favour with the local Indians. So to save his bakery, Mr. Dotivala started selling the old bread and puff, which’d by now dried out a bit, at a really cheap price.  This dried version then became so popular that he had to now start drying the bread before selling it. Later on, the dried version came to be known as the ‘Irani Biscuit’.

Nankhatai Biscuit
Nankhatai from Dotiwala, Surat

Mr. Dotivala, quite the entrepreneur and experimenter, then created the Farmasu Surti Batasa or butter biscuits, which are still very popular. He also created the now famous Nankhatai as an interpretation of a local sweet from Surat called ‘Dal’ and also probably inspired by the Irani / Afghan Khatai. I’m not sure of the exact recipe used by Mr. Dotivala for his original Nankhatai, but my childhood memories are filled with a far more crumbly-textured Nankhatai than what we encounter today, but the smell near the Nankhatai-wala was; Ah ha ha ! Intolerable!

That was because in those days Ammonium bicarbonate was used as a raising agent rather than baking soda. Ammonium bicarbonate has also been used for centuries in China to make Chinese almond cookies and steamed buns. Hence, I believe, the reference to China or ‘Cathay’ in Nankhatai.


Nankhatai Recipe

by Rita Jamshed Kapadia

from Cookbook – Parsi Cuisine: Manna of the 21st Century

If you are making the usual two-inch cookies, this recipe will yield about twenty; or you can make lots of smaller ones. They should be made a day or more ahead, to let the cardamom flavor permeate. Makes about 20.

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup ghee

  • 1/2 cup

    superfine sugar

  • 1 teaspoon yogurt

  • 2/3 cup all purpose flour

  • 2/3 cup fine semolina (suji or rava)

  • 1/4 to 1/2 teaspoon cardamom seeds, pounded

  • 1/8 teaspoon cream of tartar

  • 1/8 teaspoon baking soda

  • Chironji nuts (Charoli *), slivered almonds, or cardamom seeds, for decoration

Method

  1. Using a mixer or food processor, cream the ghee with the sugar and yogurt until pale and fluffy. (If you dont have superfine sugar, sometimes sold as bakers sugar, use regular granulated sugar and give it a few pulses in the food processor before adding to the ghee.) Add the flour, semolina, cardamom, cream of tartar, and baking soda and mix or process until the mixture resembles fine meal. It will not be a dough, nor should it be.

  2. Heat the oven to 250 degrees.

  3. Gently press a heaping teaspoon in your palm until it forms a ball, or use a miniature ice cream scoop. Compress the ball slightly by squeezing it between your palms. What you want to end up with is a flattened round. Top with 1 or more charoli. Try putting the nuts in your right palm before plopping in the mixture to be shaped. That way, the mixture shapes itself around the nuts, which are then securely embedded. Any other way of getting them on and stuck in place is just fine. Place on an ungreased baking sheet and repeat with more dough and nuts.

  4. Bake for 30 to 40 minutes. Nankhatai should cook through without browning at all. Let cool on the sheet until hard enough to handle. When they have completely cooled, store in an airtight container at room temperature.

*Note: Charoli (accent on the first syllable) is a nut the size and shape of a large brown lentil, often used in sweets. It is the seed of Buchanania latifolia, commonly called chironji in India, from the family Anacardiaceae, which means its related to mangoes and cashews. You can find it at Indian groceries. Dont buy very much at a time, and store what you dont use in the freezer.

 

Other Recipes of Nankhatai

 

Parsi Films that never made it

When Harry met Salli Boti
Bohemian Rhapsodawaterwalla
Tata, Mr. Chips
So near, yet so farcha
Malcolm Baug X
Last Tango in Parsi Colony
Where Eagles Daruwalla
Homi Alone
Dhansak With Wolves
Chariots of Fire Temple
Tehmina the Shrew and/or The Taming of Kekashroo
Anahita Hall
Guess Who's Coming to Dinyar
Antony and Cleopatra ni machhi
Apocalypse Nowrowji
Driving Miss Dinshaw
Dinshawshank Redemption and/or Maneckshawshank Redemption
The Big LeBawaski
Adil To Pagal Hai
Waiting for Godrej
Sadra Saath Nibhana
Two Gentlemen of Udwada
Much Bhonu about Nothing
Quantum of Soli
Six Dikris of Separation

When Harry met Salli Boti
Bohemian Rhapsodawaterwalla
Tata, Mr. Chips
So near, yet so farcha
Malcolm Baug X
Last Tango in Parsi Colony
Where Eagles Daruwalla
Homi Alone
Dhansak With Wolves
Chariots of Fire Temple
Tehmina the Shrew and/or The Taming of Kekashroo
Anahita Hall
Guess Who’s Coming to Dinyar
Antony and Cleopatra ni machhi
Apocalypse Nowrowji
Driving Miss Dinshaw
Dinshawshank Redemption and/or Maneckshawshank Redemption
The Big LeBawaski
Adil To Pagal Hai
Waiting for Godrej
Sadra Saath Nibhana
Two Gentlemen of Udwada
Much Bhonu about Nothing
Quantum of Soli
Six Dikris of Separation

Which Spice are you?

Zodiac Sign for Spices

I’m linking this recipe to Fiesta Friday #286, co-hosted this week are Mollie @ Frugal Hausfrau and Laurena @ Life Diet Health.

Do you measure?

Friday Fiesta co-hosts this week are Diann @ Of Goats and Greens and Petra @ Food Eat Love

Not Just Dhansak: A New Parsi Podcast

What is the first thing that comes to your mind when someone tells you they are Parsi? Is it Dhansak? Well, no one would blame you!
Over the past few decades this simple preparation of spices, lentils and vegetables cooked with meat has come to be a strong part of the Parsi identity. Dhansak is as much a part of the bawa identity as is good thoughts, words and deeds!

Read more on Parsi Khabar:
https://parsikhabar.net/news/not-just-dhansak-a-new-parsi-podcast

Food Fact: Green Pepper Bumps story is True or Fake ?

There is a food fact floating around of Green Peppers with 3 bumps or 4 bumps.

It claims that the 4 bump pepper is a female and has more seeds and tastes sweet.  The 3 bump pepper is a male and has less seeds and better for cooking.

We at ParsiCuisine.com decided to do a real taste test and compare the two Green Peppers.

  • I went to my local grocery store and picked up 2 Large Green Peepers. One with 3 bumps and other with 4 bumps.

  • Washed and cleaned the peppers.

  • Cut each into horizontal halves to measure quantity of seeds. See photo, the 4 bump one has more seeds.

  • FACT : Seeds are definitely much more in the 4 bump one.

  • Taste of 3 bumps green pepper was a bit sweeter than the other. However there is not much of a difference in taste and I had to consume a lot of the peppers to come to a conclusion.

Test results:

Food Fact is TRUE as far as the quantity of seeds.

However as far as the gender goes, story is FALSE. Green Bell peppers do not have genders that can be identified by counting their lobes. Peppers grow from flowers that have both male and female parts. The fruits do not have a gender.

In fact while at the check out, a lady named Julie remarked she always buys the 4 bump green pepper!

Tip: Suggest using the 3 bumps green pepper for stir-fry and cooking. Use the 4 bump green pepper for salads.

Reference Site: https://www.snopes.com/food/ingredient/bellpepper.asp

Now, let’s party! Join Fiesta Friday #287 by adding your link. Don’t forget to link your post to FiestaFriday.net and the co-hosts’ blogs, so we can feature you. Your co-hosts this week areJhuls @ The Not So Creative Cook and Rita @ Parsi Cuisine

I am co-hosting this week’s FIESTA FRIDAY #287 and will be
visiting and commenting on your posts as the official Fiesta Friday
representative and features selector.

Please Link & Tag your posts to my blog http://ParsiCuisine.com and http://FiestaFriday.net so that we’ll get a pingback. That way we know someone has arrived at the fiesta. Thanks Rita.

Strangers in the Night

Played and sung by Zane Commissariat.

Dhansak in the Night . . . . .

[Sing to the tune of – ‘Strangers in the Night’]

Dhansak in the night . . .
Sali boti ‘nay Daru pi ne tight

Curry-ma kolmi . . . mothi-mothi

Then everything is all right . . . .

When there’s dhansak in the night.

Doobie-doobie-doooo

Kanda Papeta per eedu *

Nashta per dahi sev ‘nay elchi keru

But everything will be all right . . . .

When there’s dhansak in the ni-i-i-i-i-ght

A Parsi peg or two

With chicken farcha will do

Papata ma gosh, ‘nay some Irani oosh

But everything will be all right . . . .

When there’s dhansak in the ni-i-i-i-i-ght

Masoor pau is nice

With doodhi-gosht ‘nay rice

Charvelu eedu, Maiji-e maakhan ma kidhu

Pun, daru pi ne tight – bawaji feels all right

When there’s dhansak in the ni-i-i-i-i-i-i-ght!