Audh - forgotten but now remembered

Audh – forgotten but now remembered

Audh Parsi Audh 

Audh is a better mood elevator than a bar of chocolate! The primary ingredient in this is rice flour and coconut milk.

It is one Parsi  dessert which is forgotten but now remembered. Just made it again today for Father’s Day

Do you remember this? 

Hint: Audh is served as Dessert.

Ingredients:

  • 1 1/4 cups fine rice flour
  • 2 cups icing sugar
  • 225 grams ghee
  • 2 cups coconut milk extracted from 1 large coconut
  • 3 1/2 cups hot water
  • 1 1/2 cups rosewater
  • 1 tbsp almonds, blanched and slivered
  • 1 tbsp peeled cardamom, coarsely crushed
  • A pinch of salt

Method:

  1. Boil water, add rice flour and sugar gradually, stirring continuously.
  2. Add one-third of the ghee to flour mixture, keep on medium heat and stir till absorbed.
  3. Add coconut milk, salt, rosewater and ghee alternately till all are absorbed.
  4. Keep stirring and cooking till mixture forms a ball and leaves sides of pan.
  5. Sprinkle half the almonds on a greased tray and spread mixture over it.
  6. Smooth out with a greased wooden spoon or greased hand and cover with cardamoms and remaining almonds.
  7. Press into mixture.
  8. Cool, cut into diamond shapes and serve.

 

Sev

Seven Ways to Celebrate Navroz 2020




Navroze / Nowruz / Nooruz is on March 21, 2020.

Commemorated in a grand and elaborate fashion, preparations for  Navroze begin well in advance. Houses are cleaned to remove all the cobwebs and painted new. They are then adorned with different auspicious symbols, namely, stars, butterflies, birds and fish. New attires are ordered and made especially for the festival. On the day of  Navroze, people dress in their new and best clothes and put on gold and silver kustis and caps. The doors and windows are beautified with garlands of roses and jasmines. Color powders are used for creating beautiful and attractive patterns, known as Chok or rangoli, on the steps and thresholds. These intricate and creative patterns display the sanctity of the festivals. Moreover, fish and floral motifs are a favorite among rangolis and considered highly auspicious.

Guests are welcomed by sprinkling rose water and rice, followed by applying a tilak. Breakfast usually consists of Sev (a vermicelli preparation roasted in ghee and choc-a-bloc with dry fruits) which is served with yogurt and enjoyed by young and old alike. After breakfast, it is time to visit the Agiary or Fire Temple to offer prayers. Special thanksgiving prayers, known as Jashan, are held and sandalwood is offered to the Holy Fire. At the end of this religious ceremony, all Parsis take the privilege to exchange new greetings with one another by saying ‘Navroze Mubarak’. Back home, special delicacies are made marking the lunch as an elaborate and delicious affair.

Various Parsi dishes, such as Sali boti (a mutton and potato preparation), chicken farchas, patrani machchi (fish steamed in a leaf), mutton pulao and dal, kid gosh and saas ni machchi (a thick white gravy with pomfret) jostle for space on the table. However, the most significant dish that forms an integral part of Navroz celebrations is pulav (rice enriched with nuts and saffron, aka biryani). Besides, plain rice and moong dal are a must on this day. Desserts too are not behind in terms of variety, the most important being falooda. It is a sweet milk drink made from vermicelli and flavored with rose essence. Lagan-nu-custard, or caramel custard, is another favorite on this occasion. The entire day is spent by visiting friends and relative and exchanging good wishes and blessings.

Suggested Menu for the Navroz day:

sev 002

Breakfast 

 Parsi Sev Sweet Vermicelli (shown above)

 Parsi Ravo (Sweet cream of wheat)

BREAKFAST: Akuri
BREAKFAST: Akuri

Akuri

Lunch

 

 Dhan Dal (Steamed Rice with plain dal) with Khari Fish

Fried Fish
Fried Fish

Fried Pomfret  (Tareli Maachi)

 

Dinner

Chicken with Apricots / Jardalu ma Marghi
Chicken with Apricots / Jardalu ma Marghi

 Chicken with Apricots / Jardalu ma Marghi

Dessert

DESSERT: Lagan nu Custard - garnished with almonds, pistachios
DESSERT: Lagan nu Custard – garnished with almonds, pistachios

 Lagan nu Custard

Batasa – a favorite biscuit snack. Good with Tea or Coffee anytime! 

Batasa

 

Dhun Dar

Happy Ganesh Chaturthi

Lord Ganesha’s favorite sweet, Modaks are sweet flour dumplings stuffed with coconut, jaggery, nutmeg and saffron. This modak recipe is a steamed version, which is also known as ‘ukdiche modak’, however there is a wide variety of this Indian dessert which includes fried modak as well.

A popular dessert from Maharashtra which is consumed highly during the festival of Ganesh Chaturthi, Modaks are now made in many parts of the country as well.

Due to Lord Ganesha being ‘Modakpriya’, the one who likes modak, 21 pieces of modak are served as the offering after the puja during Ganesh Chaturthi. The easy recipe, rich flavors of nuts and saffron, all of this appeals to our taste buds and make this dish an irresistible one.

Modak Mold/Ganesh Chaturthi Recipe (Aluminium Modak Mold)

  • The taste, flavor and texture of mould made modak is similar to the hand made modak

  • This is a special neivedyam that’s offered to Lord Ganesha on Ganesh Chaturti These moulds are made up high grade Plastic & Aluminium materials.

  • The Outer layer is round but inner shape is of modak

  • These molds can be stores easily to save space and are very easy to wash and clean Make Your Modak In The Best Shape With This Exquisite Modak Mould Different Cavities modak as per necessity

  • LIFE TIME USEABLE * NON STICKY & NON SLIPPERY

Recipe

Ingredients
For the filling:
1 Cup Coconut, grated
1 Cup Jaggery
A pinch of Nutmeg
A pinch of Saffron
For the shell:
1 Cup Water
2 tsp Ghee
1 Cup Rice flour

Method to Make Modak
Prepare fillling:
1.Heat a pan, add the grated coconut and jaggery.
2.Stir for about five minutes. Add the nutmeg and saffron, mix well.
3.Cook for another five minutes and keep aside.
Prepare modak:
1.In a deep dish, boil water with ghee. Add the salt and flour. Mix well.
2.Cover the dish and cook till its half done.
3.Spread some ghee on the base of a steel bowl and while the dough is still hot, knead it well.
4.Now take a little dough, roll it into a ball, flatten it well, shape the edges into a flower pattern.
5.Put a spoonful of the filling onto the dough and seal it.
6.Put the dumplings in a muslin cloth and steam them for 10- 15 minutes. Serve.

Kedgeree

I just made this awesome dish for my cookbook club and it was a hit! Learnt the indian plain khichri is a european fav!

Kedgeree (or occasionally kitcheriekitcharikidgereekedgareekitchiri, or khichuri) is a dish consisting of cooked, flaked fish (traditionally smoked haddock), boiled rice, parsley, hard-boiled eggs, curry powder, butter or cream, and occasionally sultanas.

According to “Larousse Gastronomique”, what we call kedgeree originated from a concoction of spiced lentils, rice, fried onions and ginger known as khichiri dating back to the 14th century and eaten across India. The early colonists developed a taste for it, as it reminded them of nursery food.

The dish can be eaten hot or cold. Other fish can be used instead of haddock such as tuna or salmon, though that is not traditional.

In India, khichari is any of a large variety of legume-and-rice dishes. These dishes are made with a spice mixture designed for each recipe and either dry-toasted or fried in oil before inclusion. This dish moved to Victorian Britain and changed dramatically to the recipe described above.

Kedgeree is thought to have originated with the Indian rice-and-bean or rice-and-lentil dish khichri, traced back to 1340 or earlier. It is widely believed that the dish was brought to the United Kingdom by returning British colonials who had enjoyed it in Indiaand introduced it to the UK as a breakfast dish in Victorian times, part of the then fashionable Anglo-Indian cuisine.

The dish was listed as early as 1790 in the recipe book of Stephana Malcolm of Burnfoot, Dumfriesshire.

 The National Trust for Scotland’s book The Scottish Kitchen by Christopher Trotter notes the Malcolm recipe and other old examples, expressing the belief that the dish was devised by Scottish regiments hankering for the tastes of India.

Hobson-Jobson cites Ibn Battuta (c. 1340) mentioning a dish of munj (moong) boiled with rice called kishrī and cites a recipe for khichri from Ain-i-Akbari (c. 1590). In Gujarat, where khichdi remains popular, the lentil and rice dish is usually served with kadhi, a spiced yogurt dish that can be mixed with the khichdi. Khichdi is usually not prepared with fish in Gujarat, although fish is sometimes eaten with khichdi in coastal villages where seafood is plentiful. According to Hobson-Jobson, while fish is eaten with kedgeree, the use of the term for “mess of re-cooked fish … is inaccurate”.

Real Irish Food, by David Bowers

Kedgeree
Place of originIndia/United Kingdom
Main ingredientsRice, smoked haddock, eggs, parsley, butter or cream
 

Kedgeree Recipe

Rice Flour Rotli

Rice Flour Rotli


Recipe tried and tested, translated from the Vividh Vani cookbook by Rita Kapadia

Chokha ni Rotli * or Rice Flour Rotli * is an age old bread enjoyed in India by the parsi community.

Yes, all rice (in its natural form) is glutenfree. This includes brown rice, white rice and wild rice. In this case, the “glutinous” term refers to the sticky nature of therice and not the gluten protein found in wheat, barley and rye. Rice is one of the most popular glutenfree grains for people with celiac disease.

The soft white rotlis are made with pure (Mill ground to number 1), a very fine ground rice flour and are very delicious to savor with meat dishes or spicy vegetables. In the rainy season they go well with the diet and are easy to digest.

How to make them is tricky, folks who make these do it so well one would think it is easy but no, it is not. I have seen the indian women and men make loads of this to serve for meals. Many people prefer white rice rotlis to the wheat ones for dietary reasons.

The trick is to knead the dough very well, the harder you knead the softer the rotli. So ladies and gentlemen get ready for some stress busting exercise with your palms and fingers!

*Also called “Roti”

I have translated this from the Vividh Vani Cookbook

There are 2 recipes for this Rotli. One is made with Milk and the other with Water. The milk rice rotli recipe will be coming up soon. Stay tuned.

Recipe with Water

Ingredients

1 cup Rice flour plus extra rice flour for dusting while rolling out the rotlis

3 tsp Ghee (optional)

1 cup boiling hot water

1/2 tsp Salt (optional)

Method

Normal dough method

  1. Shift the rice flour and put in a flat container to make the dough. Typically  a thali is used.  

  2. Make a pile of the flour with a pit in the center.

  3. Boil the water piping hot with the salt and ghee. 

  4. Immediately pour this into the flour. Let the water mixture come up to the rim of the pit.

  5. Keep this for 2 minutes to get absorbed and form the dough. Add more water if needed but do not let it get too runny.

  6. Knead with both hands and palms. Wet your palms with water if needed. Knead to a soft dough.

  7. Make small balls and dust with extra flour. Keep the balls covered with a damp cloth so they do not dry out.

  8. Heat up a non stick pan or indian  tava

  9. Now start rolling out the rotli on a marble or a wooden patlo. Dust with rice flour to prevent sticking. Make it thick to start with, practice makes a perfect rotli eventually.

  10. Put on the hot tava and bake for 10 seconds. Using a spatula or tavatha Flip and bake the other side for 30 seconds. Flip again (back to the first side) and puff the rotli.

  11. In a clean Rotli Box, store the rotli in muslin cloth so it does not dry out. Any box will work, but a chapati box works the best for me. (See the chapati products from Amazon * below)

  12. Serve immediately or keep for 1 day.


There are 2 techniques for this Rotli. One is made with a normal dough process and second which is called “Khichi”.

Khichi Dough Method

In a large pot, boil rice flour, salt, and ghee.

Cover pot and keep for 1 minute to form the khichi.

Turn out onto your counter and dust the flour, knead to a smooth dough. These khichi rotli come out very soft, white and fluffy. Since the dough is semi-cooked the rotli will always be cooked thoroughly.

Proceed to make the rotli balls and rotlis as described above.

Note: Vividh Vani mentions using Rangoon Rice Flour, Mill Rice Flour, Patni Rice Flour which were products from the Eighteenth Century and an Bygone Era. Please use the best and fine ground rice flour you can locate. Here are some examples of the amazon products.

*Disclosure – “We are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliated sites.”

Kichri With Massour Dal

by Davis Tanis

  • YIELD 6 to 8 servings
  • TIME 45 minutes, plus 1 hour’s soaking

Kichri, a traditional Indian dish, is a delightful savory combination of dal and basmati rice cooked together. Lots of other cultures serve something similar: rice and pigeon peas throughout the Caribbean, or rice and brown lentils in many Middle Eastern countries. It can be served alone, with a dollop of yogurt, for breakfast or lunch, or as a side dish with grilled or roasted meats. Some cooks add more liquid for a kichri that is more on the soupy side. Sizzling the spices in ghee makes the kichri quite aromatic.

Featured in: The How And Why Of Dal

INGREDIENTS

  • 1 cup massour dal (split red lentils)
  • 2 cups basmati rice
  • 2 tablespoons ghee
  • 3 small hot green chiles, split lengthwise
  • ½ teaspoon cumin seeds
  • 4 cardamom pods
  • 1 2-inch stick cinnamon
  • 6 cloves
  • 6 black peppercorns
  • 1 small onion, diced fine
  • ½ teaspoon turmeric
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 2 cups plain yogurt (optional)

PREPARATION

  1. Pick over lentils, then combine with rice in a medium mixing bowl. Add cold water and rinse several times, draining with a fine sieve, until water runs clear. Cover with cold water and soak for 1 hour, then drain well.
  2. Heat ghee in a saucepan over medium heat. Add chiles, cumin, cardamom, cinnamon, cloves and peppercorns. Let sizzle briefly until cumin seeds begin to brown. Add onion, stir to coat and cook until lightly browned, about 2 minutes.
  3. Add lentil-rice mixture, turmeric, salt and 4 cups water. Bring to a boil, cover and turn heat to low. Cook for 15 minutes, then let rest, covered, for 10 minutes. Fluff mixture before serving. Accompany with plain yogurt if you wish.

Bring in the rain! Parsi Custom of bringing in rains by an community effort of collecting Rice, Dal and Ghee to make Khichri

You may have heard of the American Red Indian Dance for Rains, but have you heard of the Parsi Custom of bringing in rains by an community effort of collecting Rice, Dal and Ghee to make Khichri?

In Navsari (a small town in the Gujarat State of India) often referred to as the “Dharam Ni Tekdi”  Parsis has many of the traditional customs and practices that have over time been forgotten in other cities and town. The Ghee Khichri ritual on Bahman Mahino and Bahman Roj is one of them. Boys go from house to house, asking for rice, dal, oil, ghee and other uncooked products. The ladies pour generous portions in the collection bags. The boys are also splashed with water, which the boys have to dodge carefully.

Later this uncooked food is gathered at one location and is cooked into a collective feast.The whole endeavor is to ask the rain gods to come and bestow Mother Earth with water, after the long summer months in India.

A folk song is heard from moholla to moholla in Navsari:

GHEEE KHICHRI NO PAISO
DORIYAA NO RUPIYO
VARSAADJI TOH AAYEGA
DUMRI SHER LAAYEGA
DUMRI TAARI OAT MAA KHARA PAANINET MAA
OTTI KE POTTI
REL AAVI MOTTI
ALLAA GOCAL PAANI MOKAL
VARSAADJI NU PAANI TOH MITTHU NE MITTHU

Another song in Gujarati song for welcoming rains after a hot summer:

“Aavre Aav Varsad,

Dhebaryo Parsaad,

Uunni uunni rotli,

ne karela nu shaak! “

Translation:

“Come oh come rain,

Manna water from the heaven,

Enjoy with us, our warm rotli,

and karela vegetables “

Song and Music:

Click here for a Aryuvedic Khichri Recipe

Click here for Vaghareli Khichri Recipe

See a NEWS Video in Gujarati by Doordarshan.

Thanks to ParsiKhabar.net for video

Irani Rice Tahdig

HOW TO PERFECT THE IMPERFECT ART OF IRANIAN RICE TAHDIG

by Naz

When I first moved out of my childhood home, only a week went by before I found myself craving my mother’s cooking. Specifically, I missed Persian rice with tahdig—the prized golden, crispy crust at the bottom of the rice pot.

Rice is the crown jewel of Persian cuisine, and Iranians have elevated its preparation to an art form. Whether we’re serving a simple saffron rice or one of the many variations in which it is mixed with other ingredients like meat or lentils, a cook’s reputation practically rests on their ability to turn out perfect, fluffy grains and an evenly crisped and bronzed layer.

For all its seeming simplicity, rice with tahdig takes a surprising amount of know-how. Ideally, each grain should remain separate and long when cooked, not sticky or compacted. To achieve this, we cook long-grain rice chelo-style: a two-step method of first par-cooking the rice in boiling water, then steaming it with the addition of fat at the bottom of the pan. It is the steaming step that simultaneously sets a crisp tahdig at the base and finishes cooking the rice grains.

If I had to name one essential tip or tool, using a nonstick, flat-bottomed pot aids critically in allowing the rice to release from the pan in a cohesive mass. Some recipes will even place an ingredient between the rice and the pan, such as a flat lavash bread or an embellishment of thinly sliced potatoes, which have the added benefit of preventing sticking (and providing another layer of flavor).

No one turns out a perfect tahdig every time, but it’s a thrill regardless. And with a little practice, patience, luck, and love, an almost-perfect one is certainly something to celebrate.

The Basic: Chelo ba Tahdig

Steamed Saffron Rice with Tahdig (Chelo ba Tahdig)

Iranians usually serve chelo ba tahdig with stew, kebabs, or meat dishes. Herbs and alliums, feta, or walnuts often share the table. Get the recipe for Steamed Saffron Rice with Tahdig (Chelo ba Tahdig) »

Fragrant, steamed saffron rice—called chelo—is omnipresent at the Iranian table. Serve it alongside stews, kebabs, and other meat and vegetable dishes. Or use this recipe as a base for all of the more-elaborate variations that follow.

Choose a Quality Rice

iranian rice

The rice paddies of northern Iran are known for producing especially long, slender grains of rice with a sweet, grassy fragrance. Their grains tend to stay separate and intact during cooking. While Iranian rice is not always readily available in the U.S., a good-quality Indian basmati—such as Royal Chef’s Secret brand’s extra-long-grain rice or Basmati Lal Quila brand—is an excellent substitute.

Showstopping: Tahcheen-e Morgh

Baked Saffron Yogurt Rice with Chicken (Tahcheen-e Morgh)

Bake this tahcheen, a saffron rice with chicken, in a clear glass baking dish so you can check on the crisping of the rice’s bottom layer. Get the recipe for Baked Saffron Yogurt Rice with Chicken (Tahcheen-e Morgh) »

The word tahcheen translates to “arranged on the bottom.” In this version, pieces of juicy saffron chicken are arranged between layers of a thick yogurt-and-egg rice. It adds a pleasant tanginess, and forms a tahdig that’s denser and less crunchy but just as satisfying. Tahcheen can be prepared in a pot on the stove, but I prefer to bake it in a glass dish so I can spy on the tahdig’s progress as it cooks.

Serve a Side of Herbs

a platter of fresh herbs, alliums, and radishes

Sabzi khordan—a platter of fresh herbs, alliums, and radishes—makes a regular appearance at the Persian table. The assortment brightens and lightens a meal, while also aiding in the digestion of rich main dishes. Nibble on it between bites of buttery rice.

A Meal in One: Sabzi Polo ba Tahdig-e Mahi

Herbed Rice with Fish Tahdig (Sabzi Polo ba Tahdig-e Mahi)

Have a fishmonger remove the branzino’s spine and ribs, to make the fish more malleable and prevent bones from sneaking into the rice. Get the recipe for Herbed Rice with Fish Tahdig (Sabzi Polo ba Tahdig-e Mahi) »

Polo is a word for mixed rice dishes that might be steamed with legumes and dried fruits (as in adas polo below), or complemented with herbs (sabzi polo), meat, vegetables, or, in this case, whole fish. Sabzi polo is served commonly for Nowruz, the Persian New Year. Traditionally, the fish is served alongside herbed rice—the fish symbolizes life, and the herbs symbolize rebirth.

“A cook’s reputation practically rests on their ability to turn out the perfect, fluffy grains and an evenly crisped and bronzed layer.”

With Bread Tahdig: Adas Polo

Persian Lentil Rice with Lavash Tahdig (Adas Polo)

A thin layer of lavash bread can be cooked beneath the rice to serve as a tahdig. Press it flat against the pot for even cooking. Get the recipe for Persian Lentil Rice with Lavash Tahdig (Adas Polo) »

Adas polo means “lentil rice.” It is a humble, comforting mix that includes golden onions, lentils, and plump dried fruits such as raisins and dates—commonly used to balance the cuisine’s tart dishes with a touch of sweetness. You can serve adas polo with a dollop of plain yogurt, or, like me, with more dried fruit.

The highly sought-after Iranian crispy rice just takes a little patience, know-how, and luck

“A cook’s reputation practically rests on their ability to turn out the perfect, fluffy grains and an evenly crisped and bronzed layer.”

Naz’s Rice Tips

Naz’s Rice Tips

The traditional Iranian way to bring saffron to life

Zachary Zavislak

Bloom Your Saffron
The Iranian tradition is to bring a small amount of water to a boil, let it sit for a few minutes, then pour it over ground saffron to bring out its flavors and color. (Still-boiling water is said to kill the delicate spice’s “soul.”) Stir the mixture, cover it, and let it steep for 5 minutes. Then add the liquid and saffron particles to the dish as needed.

Soak the Rice
Soaking the rice in salted water softens it without activating the starch, allowing the grains to remain separate, intact, and fluffy in the finished dish. Some brands require a longer soak and take longer to soften in the initial boiling phase—part of the minutiae of Persian rice-making. Trial-and-error is the best method: Familiarize yourself with the brand of rice available to you, and start with 1 hour of soaking on average.

Know Your Pot and Stove
The “art” of tahdig-making comes into play here. No two tahdigs will ever turn out the same. But to get as close to consistent as possible, start with a heavy-duty nonstick pot with a flat bottom and straight sides. Take notes each time you make a tahdig, cross your fingers, and be confident in your flip. Beyond that, just hope that luck is with you.

A Floral Finish

Yogurt Cucumber Sauce with Rose Petals (*Maast-o Khiar*)

The use of roses—petals and waters flavored with them—is common in Persian and Middle Eastern kitchens. Naz sprinkles the petals atop this tart, cooling yogurt sauce she serves with crispy rice dishes, and often with stews and meats. Get the recipe for Yogurt Cucumber Sauce with Rose Petals (Maast-o Khiar) »

Chicken Tikka Masala

INGREDIENTS

2 pounds skinless, boneless chicken breasts, halved lengthwise
6 garlic cloves, finely grated
4 teaspoons finely grated peeled ginger
4 teaspoons ground turmeric
2 teaspoons garam masala
2 teaspoons ground coriander
2 teaspoons ground cumin
1½ cups whole-milk yogurt
1 tablespoon kosher salt

3 tablespoons ghee (clarified butter) or vegetable oil
1 small onion, thinly sliced
¼ cup tomato paste
6 cardamom pods, crushed
2 dried chilies or 1/2 teaspoons crushed red pepper flakes
1 28-ounce can whole peeled tomatoes
2 cups heavy cream
¾ cup chopped fresh cilantro plus sprigs for garnish

2 Cups Steamed Basmati rice

METHOD
Combine garlic, ginger, turmeric, garam masala, coriander, and cumin in a small bowl.

Whisk yogurt, salt, and half of spice mixture in a medium bowl; add chicken and turn to coat. Cover and chill 4-6 hours. Cover and chill remaining spice mixture.

Heat ghee in a large heavy pot over medium heat. Add onion, tomato paste, cardamom, and chiles and cook, stirring often, until tomato paste has darkened and onion is soft, about 5 minutes. Add remaining half of spice mixture and cook, stirring often, until bottom of pot begins to brown, about 4 minutes.

Add tomatoes with juices, pureeing  them in mixer before. Bring to a boil, reduce heat, and simmer, stirring often and scraping up browned bits from bottom of pot, until sauce thickens, 8-10 minutes.

Add cream and chopped cilantro. Simmer, stirring occasionally, until sauce thickens, 30-40 minutes.

Skewer bite-size chicken pieces and grill on a Tandoor Oven or indoor/outdoor Grill or a 400 C oven for 10 minutes. Idea is to grill to a dark brown color and taste. (This is the secret to a good chicken tikka masala)

Add to sauce, and simmer, stirring occasionally, until chicken is cooked through, 5 minutes. Serve with rice and cilantro sprigs.

TIP: Chicken can be made 2 days ahead. Cover; chill. Reheat before serving.

FiestaFriday with Diann @ Of Goats and Greens and Jhuls @ The Not So Creative Cook

Grilled Tandoori Chicken

Photo: Ayurvedic Detox with Khichri

Keri ni Khichri

Aryuvedic Sweet Rice and Dal with Mango

This Mango Khicri is delicious by itself and a known parsi favorite in the mango season. Of course cooked in USA any time – it is mango time anytime!

INGREDIENTS

4 cups Rice

1 cup Tuvar Dal

1 1/2 cup sugar

4 Mangoes peeled and cubed (one per cup of rice ratio)

1 cup desiccated or freshly grated coconut

1 tbsp Ginger Garlic paste

1/2 teaspoon Salt

1/2 tsp Turmeric

Pinch of cumin seeds

1 Onion sliced

Curry leaves (optional)

3 tbsp Oil or Ghee for cooking

4 Cups of water

METHOD

Soak the Rice and Tuvar Dal for 4 – 5 hours.

Brown the onion in hot oil.

Ginger-garlic paste goes in right after sauteing the onions, saute for 5 seconds.


Add Coconut, Rice and dal, curry leaves and spices.

Stir until well blended.

Cook Rice with 4 cups of water. Do not cover Rice with water or it will get too sticky.

Cook for 20 minutes at low heat with cover, stir occasionally.

Combine mangoes, curry leaves, cumin seeds, sugar and salt. Mix well.

Remove skin and slice mango, set aside 20 slices for garnish. Cut other slices into bite-size pieces, stir into Rice (Khichri).

Garnish with slices of mango and fresh coriander leaves.

Serve hot with Papadum or Sheek Kababs

Sample recipe from my cookbook:

Now, let’s party! Join Fiesta Friday #276

Dhun Dar

On New Year day, Birthday, Anniversary or a Festive occasion the parsi auspicious dish to make is Dhun Dar.

“Dhun” a gujarati word means “wealth” and “Dar” is a translation of the indian lentil called “Dal” which come in various lentils of Toovar dal, Masoor dal, Channa dal, Urad dal and so on. The dal used in dhun dar is toover dal.

Parsi  Dhun Dar 

( Also known as Mora Dal Chawal)

Chawal (Steamed Rice)

  • 2 cups basmati Rice

  • 4 cups water

  • 1 tbsp Salt

  • 2 tbsp Oil or ghee

  • 2 inch piece of cinnamon stick (broken)

  • 5 cardamom pods (broken)

  1. Wash the Rice then add the required water, ghee, Salt and all of above.

  2. Put in a large flat bottomed pot with a cover and bring to a rolling boil.

  3. Next lower heat to lowest setting and cook covered, on full flame for 20 minutes.

  4. Keep covered till ready to serve. (Note – do not open cover unless you need to. this keeps the steam in and the Rice soft)

Mori Dal

  • 3 cups Dal  ( Toovar Dal also known a pigeon peas )

  • 2 tsp Salt

  • 1 tbsp Turmeric

  • 1 pod Garlic

  • 1 tbsp Cumin seeds

  • 3 cups water

  • 1 large Onion, finely sliced

  • 2 tsps butter or ghee

  1. Wash the Dal well then add water, Salt, Turmeric and allow to cook till tender in a pressure cooker (15 minutes) on low heat.

  2. Mash the Dal with a hand grinder or potato masher. Make it nice and blended.

  3. Add 1 tsp. butter or ghee (this makes the Dal shiny).

  4. Fry the sliced Onions, chopped Garlic and fry in Oil till light gold.

  5. Then add the Cumin seeds and remove from stove.

  6. Add all the fried items to the Dal, cover to keep the aroma in. Keep warm.

  7. Usually a sweet and sour “Khataa Mittha” Patyo, Fried Fish, Patra ni Maachi  or a spicy meat dish “Boti” is served as an accompaniment to the rice and dal.

Sample Recipe from Cookbook:

Title: Mastering Parsi Cuisine 

 

Gos-no-kharo Ras Chaval with Khatti Mithi Kachumbar

Ingredients
1 kg tender Goat Mutton or Lamb – cut into medium pieces, washed & left to drain in colander
6 large onions – chopped very fine (cut like chhudna no kando)
4 tomatoes – again chopped very fine (tamota)
4 Potatoes – cut into 2 halves (papeta)
8-10 pods of garlic (lasan)
1.5″ piece of ginger (aadu)
6-8 green chillies (leela marcha)
1 large piece of cinnamon (tajj)
6-7 cloves (lavang)
4-5 green cardamoms (nalli elchi)
10 black peppercorns (kara mari)
2-3 bay leaves (tajj patta)
3/4 tsp cumin seeds (jeru)
1 full tsp turmeric (harad)
2-3 tsp red Kashmiri chilli pwdr (lal march ni bhuki)
1 tbsp coriander/cumin pwdr (dhana jeeru)
1/2 tsp garam masala pwdr
2 cups chopped fresh coriander (lili kothmir)
2-3 scoops of oil and pure ghee in equal portions
salt to taste

Method

  1. Crush ginger garlic to a coarse paste and marinate washed mutton along with salt and leave aside for half an hour.

  2. In a large pressure cooker fry the onions along with all the dry garam masala spices, jeera and bay leaves to golden brown.

  3. Add the marinated mutton along with chopped green chilies and continue to roast stirring continuously.

  4. Add the powdered masalas and keep roasting on medium fire until small bubbles of oil begin to surface.

  5. Add 1 cup of chopped coriander and stir for a minute more.

  6. Now add the halved potatoes and about 4 cups of pre-boiled hot water and cook in closed cooker up to 3 whistles on high flame then simmer for 5 min after 3 whistles and put off the fire. Allow to cool until cooker lid pops on its own.

  7. Now with open cooker, once again put it on high flame and add the very finely chopped tomatoes, when it comes to boil, lower the flame to full simmer and allow to cook with loose lid for 10 – 15 min.

  8. Check for salt and add if you find it requires a little more.

  9. Garnish with remaining one cup of finely chopped fresh coriander and serve on steamed white rice with a liberal squeeze of lime and parsi khatti mitthi kachumbar

 This is a sample recipe from our cookbooks

This Rus Chawal is easy to make in an Instant Pot. Follow same instructions but use the IP buttons to cook.

Milk Pudding

Milk Pudding

Serves 4

Ingredients

6 cups milk

1/4 cup raw Rice

1 cup sugar

Few pistachios, almonds and saffron strands for garnish

1 tsp cardamom powder

Method
1. Process the raw rice in any food chopper till it is broken up in small bits.

2. Boil the rice, milk and sugar till creamy consistency.

3. Add in the cardamom and let it cool.

4. Sprinkle with chopped pistachios, chopped almonds and saffron strands and refrigerate.

When you are ready to serve, pour milk pudding into a decorative dessert dish. I used my icecream dessert cup, makes a good effect when you hand your guests the dessert.

This Indian dessert is a favorite at Diwali time or in any party. It is called DOODH PAK in Indian gujarati. Doodh is the  word for milk, and pak is term for a sweet dessert.

Instant Pot: Dhansak (Lentils with meat) or Masala Dal (Lentils without meat)

Instant Pot (IP) Recipe of the Parsi Dhansak  by Rita Kapadia

(Also spelt as  Dhansaak, Dhanshak,  Dhunsak, Thansak)

This dhansak was made in an instant pot which is a pressure cooker with souped up button controls. Gives you the flexibility of walking away and setting it on a timer.

As you may already know dhansak is a difficult dish to make, however, I have simplified the instant pot steps, so do give it a try.

Vegetarians can leave the meat out and make the masala dal, it comes out very good. Dhansak dal without the meat is referred by indian parsis as “Masala Dal”.

Also, this author has read and used the Vividh Vani cookbook by Meherbai Jamshedji Wadia and found that chicken (marghi) dhansak is a very a traditional dish made by parsis in Mumbai (Bombay) in the 1800s.

 Step 1: Place all these tempering (Vaghar) ingredients in your instant pot and saute using the “Brown” function for 5 minutes

  • 1 small onion finely chopped.

  • 2 tbsp oil.

  • 2 tsp Ginger/Garlic/Chili Paste. Make paste by grinding 1 inch piece of gingerroot, 4 cloves garlic and 2 hot Jalapeno chilies.

  • 2 tsp Badshah Dhansak Masala.

  • 2 tsp Dhana (coriander seeds) and Jeera (Cumin seeds) powder.

  • Salt and Black Pepper powder to taste.

     Immediately add step 2 dhansak ingredients to this tempering (Vaghar).

Step 2

For the Dhansak dal: place all the following in the Instant Pot and cook on “Pressure” mode for 5 minutes (no more)  Use “Beans” function button:

Ingredients

  • 1 lb Chicken skinned and washed. ( Lamb, Goat can be substituted )

  • 1 1/2 cups Tuvar Dal washed and soaked for 30 minutes.

  • 1 large onion chopped.

  • 1 Tomato chopped.

  • 1/2 cup fresh coriander leaves chopped.(optional)

  • 1/2 cup fresh methi leaves chopped.(optional)

  • 5 leaves of fresh mint.

  • 3 inch piece of yellow/orange pumpkin.

  • 2 Potatoes peeled and quartered.

  • 2 tsp salt.

  • 1 tsp Turmeric.

  • Water enough to cover the contents.

Step 3

  1. In the Instant Pot (IP) do the step 1 and 2.

  2. Open  IP and remove meat and potatoes. Set aside in serving container.

  3. Mash the dal in the IP with electric blender or by hand. Add water if needed.

  4. Close IP cover

  5. Press IP button to simmer (Slow cook) and set for 3 minutes.

  6. Open IP by using the Stop button and setting the valve on “Steam”.

  7. Taste and add salt/spices to your taste.

  8. Add the meat and potatoes and simmer 5 more minutes in a serving bowl.

 Dhansak is served with Hot Brown Rice and Kachumber.


Paperback or eBook on Parsi Dhansak by Rita Kapadia

Includes step-by-step instructions for the Regular pressure cooker process and Instant Pot process.

 

Instant Pot: Ayurvedic Detox with Khichri

Khichri is a free-form dish, allowing for many variations. Although any type of lentil can be used like Mung, Tuver, or Masoor, the most common parsi version uses Tuver dal.

White Basmati rice is used since it is easy to digest but brown rice can also be used for more fiber and minerals in your diet. The spices are variable depending on your taste and liking. So is the ratio of lentils to rice. The consistency can be runny or dry as desired, however make sure the dal and rice are thoroughly cooked and soft.

The lentils and ghee are now a days available in Whole Foods, Amazon or local Indian Grocery Stores like Patel Brothers, Apna Bazar, etc

Khichri  is the Ayurvedic  detox food.  Khichadi, pronounced kich-ah-ree and sometimes spelled “kitchari” or “khichdi,” has long been used to nourish babies and the elderly, the sick and the healthy during special times of Detox and Diet Cleansing.

This khichri was made in a Instant Pot. It came out moist, soft and took less time to make!

Recipe

Photo: Ayurvedic Detox with Khichri
Photo: Ayurvedic Detox with Khichri

1/2 cup rice white or brown basmati or jasmine rice
1/2 cup  Mung Dal (split) or Tuver Dal
2 cups water
1 tsp turmeric

1 tsp salt
2 tbsps oil or Ghee

Tempering

2-3 tbsp clarified butter (ghee)

1/2 chopped medium Onion

1 tsp cumin seeds (jeera)

Method

Wash and clean the rice and dal and soak in water for 15 minutes.

In a Instant Pot and press “Brown” button.
To temper: Finely slice the onion and fry in oil till golden brown. Add cumin seeds and count to 3.
Add dal, water, salt and turmeric and bring to rolling boil on high heat. This is crucial to khichri coming out well done.
Add rice and bring to boil again.
Cover instant pot and set timer to 9 minutes.
Cook for 9 minutes covered and then keep instant pot on warm till you serve.

This rice dish goes well with kids, give with a little sugar added to 1 year old.

Cleanse Regimen:

A khichri cleanse consists of eating khichri for breakfast, lunch and dinner for 3 consecutive days. The theory behind this regimen is to give the digestive tract (intestines) a chance to rest, regulate and heal itself.

Khichri has the primary and essential nutrients for the body, while being gentle on the digestive system. After the cleanse, stagnation in the cleanser’s digestion and metabolism is alleviated , allowing him/her to resume a normal healthy lifestyle and diet.

  1. Drink one cup of hot water with lemon upon wakening.

  2. Allow 30 minutes before eating breakfast.

  3. Do yoga in this time or walk.

  4. For breakfast eat 1 cup of cooked khichri.

  5. For lunch and dinner eat khichri until full, avoid overeating.

  6. For snack eat vegetable and fruits.

  7. Repeat for 3 consecutive days.

Sandhra

An ancient delicacy. Sandhra are fluffy white pancake like delicacy. They are made from rice flour that is kept to rise. You got to make them to know the taste of bygone days!

Here is the much sought after recipe.

Makes 25

Ingredients

3/4 kg. Rice Flour

4 cups milk

900 gm. Ghee

2 cups fermented toddy (or fermented coconut milk)

900 gm. Powdered sugar

100 gm ghee to grease plates

5 Almonds blanched and slivered

Method

  1. Mix one cup flour into the milk and stir in the ghee.

  2. Place on fire and keep stiring till it boils.

  3. Remove immediately and cool.

  4. Pour this in to the rest of the flour. Add toddy and mix thoroughly.

  5. It should be consistency of cream.

  6. When dough is well risen, mix in the sugar

  7. Grease 5 metal plates with ghee and pour mixture in carefully.

  8. To steam the Sandhra in the traditional manner, place a large metal stand or ring in a very large vessel.

  9. On this stand, stack the 5 plates, with 2 crossed sticks between each plate.

  10. Place vessal on fire with hot water reaching just below the stand.

  11. Cover vessel and steam till Sandhra are set.

  12. Remove from plates and cool.

  13. Repeat till all are done.

  14. When cool wrap in a napkin cloth or foil so they do not dry.

  15. If desired, Sprinkle almonds on top when serving.

From Cookbook: Parsi Cuisine Manna of the 21st Century: Indian Parsi Cuisine Available as a Kindle or Paperback Edition.
by Rita Kapadia (Author)

Written for today’s generation of cooks and food enthusiasts, the cookbook “Parsi Cuisine Manna of the 21st Century” by Rita Jamshed Kapadia provides a treasure trove of recipes, along with an immersive cultural experience for those seeking to understand this ancient and timeless cuisine of India.

With classical and regional Parsi / Parsee recipes as well as an introduction to Parsi heritage, history, and culture. The book’s full color photographs are intertwined with descriptions of ancient and modern Parsi ceremonies, poetry, folktales, travelogue excerpts and anecdotes.

The ”Parsi Cuisine Manna of the 21st Century” is a labor of love. The book began in an effort to maintain and preserve our recipes and traditions for the next generation, many of whom have been raised in India. Today, as accomplished adults in their own fields Rita’s children encouraged her to write this book for their generation.

LEVTA (Mudfish) WITH KHICHDI

by Jenifer Petigara Mistry

Growing up in Surat and that too the old part of the city, at 10-12 years of age Makar-Sankranti was a day full of loud music blaring from the rooftops, “Kaipo Chhe” or “Kaipoch” or”aye peli peeli gayi ” or “Laali ni pi” sounds. In the narrow streets, there would be people standing on the most precarious perches on the roofs, convoluted Roman athletes with arms to the sky waving frantically(coz you can’t see the thread they were holding from afar), shouting to each other from one building to another,.. literally a city that existed on the roofs rather than the roads that day !! My friend and I would also climb up to the water tanks.. a rather steep, dangerous climb to be done only once in a year, stand or sit on minute spaces between the roof tiles, munching at the Til-Laddu and Fafda-Jalebi!!

Growing up, for all my bravado I was an introvert so I could never ask anyone to let me fly the kite or teach. Besides Dad said money was too scarce to throw away on glassed thread and paper !! But once in a while someone would be nice to let me hold on to the string for a while .. that would be my highlight for the week .. until another little joy caught my fancy .. small joys .. small little tidbits of innocence.. every little second crammed with a ton-full of life .. that’s what I remember even today .

That is – that and food that grandmom would cook. For her special days had to have special menus. So Makarsankranti was khichdi, Bangan Bharatu (what she called Bharat) and Levta (mudfish). So in remembrance of her and all those childhood memories today I decided to cook khichdi and Levta. I skipped the bharatu mainly because I am not a great fan of the veggies 😃😃

LEVTA IN FRESH GARLIC, SPRING ONIONS AND CORIANDER

250 g mudfish (you can substitute with fish fillet or prawns) – cleaned
1/4 cup chopped spring onions
1/4 cup chopped fresh garlic
1/4 cup chopped coriander
3-4 green chilies chopped
1/2 tsp garlic paste
1 tsp ginger paste
1/2 tsp mango ginger (amba haldi-optional)
1 tsp coriander powder
1/2 tsp cumin powder
1/4 tsp turmeric powder
Salt
Oil
For Marination : Marinate fish for 60 minutes in ..
1 tsp garlic paste
1 tsp red chillies powder
1 tsp cumin powder
1/2 tsp coriander powder
1/2 tsp dhansak masala
1/2 tsp turmeric powder
Salt

Slightly heat oil in a pan and add the pastes. Sauté for 30 seconds and add chopped garlic, green chillies and spring onions. Sauté till they start slightly wilting. Add the dry spices and sauté for 30 seconds more. Add the chopped coriander, salt and mix. Add the fish. Cover with the masala. Reduce to simmer and cook closed about 2 minutes on each side. This is a delicate fish and hence do not turn it too often or too roughly. Enjoy with khichdi and spring onions !!

Special Meal .. Special people to remember ..

Vaghareli Khichri

It is the Ayurvedic detox food.  Khichadi, pronounced kich-ah-ree and sometimes spelled “kitchari” or “khichdi,” has long been used to nourish babies and the elderly, the sick and the healthy during special times of Diet Detox & Cleansing.

 Vaghareli Khichri Recipe 

Ingredients

  • 1 Cup rice (barik Surti kolam, basmati)

  • 1 Cup maag/mung OR red masoor daar (red lentils)

  • 2 Cups Water for cooking

  • 5 tsps Ghee or Clarified Butter

Method

  1. Clean and wash both 3 times with water, and keep aside soaked in 2 cups water.

  2. Put the soaked dar/rice in a cooking vessel, add Water and 1 diced tomato, 2 jacket potatoes quartered, 2-3 slit green chillies and put on fire.

  3. In another thick bottomed vaghar vessel, add 1 tblsp pure ghee, add 1 tsp jeera, crackle 1 tsp mustard seeds, add 2 stems of curry patta, 10-12 cloves finely chopped garlic, 2 finely sliced onions, 1 tspn harad, 1/2 tsp hing, 3-4 red kashmir chillies and fry to a nice golden brown crisp Vaghar.

  4. Add this to the cooking dar rice khichri and cook covered on slow fire until soft

    and done. (as we say in parsi gujarati – vavri)

  5. Garnish with freshly cut coriander and eat just by itself or with fried vengna slices (shown above)  or dahi kadhi (shown above), sukka boomla no tarapori patio or Ghee.


Parsi Berry Pulao

 

by  Jennifer Mascarenhas

Few of my friends went to Sodabottleopenerwala and relished the Parsi cuisine there! While talking to me, their demand arose for home cooked versions of the restaurant dishes!

So, on a recent potluck lunch, I made Parsi Berry Pulao and teamed it with some parsi ‘ kachumber’ on the side.

Mumbaikars who’ve been to Britannia Cafe at Ballard Estate can’t forget this…It’s the one and only Berry Pulao that has no match elsewhere. I love Parsi cuisine because of two things, the lavish use of dry fruits and the dishes are just mildly spicy.

Parsi Berry Pulao was an instant hit in a family and also in my friends circle ! I have made the vegetarian version today, but you team it with chicken or mutton as well.

Ahhh !! Berry pulao. The thought of the soft fluffy rice and the tartness of the berries is enough to make my mouth water. I used a mix and match of 3-4 different family recipes and here’s what I came up with… this Persian Recipe will definitely impress all of you !!

Ingredients:

2 cups basmati rice

1 cup soya mini nuggets (You can also use chicken/mutton instead of soya)

1 cup fried onions

½ cup green peas

1 carrot (diced)

5 large onions (sliced)

3 mushrooms (sliced)

2 large potatoes (diced)

½ cup mixed berries ( I have used rainsins, blackberries and cranberries)

2 garlic cloves (minced)

½ inch ginger ( grated)

8-10 Almonds ( sliced)

2 green chillies ( finely chopped)

2 tsp sugar

3 tbsp ghee

2 sticks cinnamon

1 tsp cumin seeds

½ tsp red chilli powder

1 tsp coriander powder

Salt to taste

Instructions:

Wash the rice well and soak it in water for around 30 minutes before cooking.

Slice 3 large onions and deep fry them on low heat till they are well caramalized and turn crispy. This is one of key ingredient in making this aromatic pulao.

Heat the ghee in a deep thick bottomed dish.  Once it is heated, add the cumin seeds and let it sputter on low heat.

Add the ginger and garlic and fry

Add the green chillies. Fry

Now, add the 2 sliced onions and fry till the onions have slightly caramelized

Next, add the potatoes and cook on low heat till the potatoes are cooked.

Now, add the diced carrots and let it cook for around 3 minutes.

Keep this mixture aside.

In the same dish, caramelize the sugar on low heat.

Add the rice and the remaining ingredients and mix well.

Add the potato mixture that you had kept aside to the rice as well.

Give it all a good stir. Cover the pan and let the rice cook on medium – low heat till well done.

Garnish the pulao with the fried onions and the sliced almonds. Mix well.

Switch off the heat and leave it covered for around 20 minutes before serving.

Enjoy this pulao with some Parsi ‘ kachumber’ on the side !! Totally Yummilicious !!

 

Khorshed Masi’s  Junglee Palav / Dill (Suva Ni Bhaji) no Palav

by Shirin Engineer

Ingredients:

I pound Mutton (Goat meat) (if Goat meat is not available then Lamb or Beef can be substituted)

2 potatoes (unpeeled) washed and cut into roughly 1 – 2 inch pieces.

2 cups of Basmati Rice

I medium red Onion

I bunch of cilantro destemmed and cleaned

1 bunch of Dill (suva ni bhaji), with the thick stems removed and cleaned

6 curry leaves

4 large garlic cloves

1 tablespoon of adu lasan (ginger garlic paste)

4 green Thai Chilies

6 cloves

6 cardamom

6 black peppercorns

¼ whole nutmeg

½ stick of cinnamon

2 tablespoons of Coconut oil (if coconut oil is not available, you can substitute with any vegetable oil).

Salt to taste

 

Method:

Grind the cloves, cardamom, peppercorn, nutmeg and cinnamon in a coffee grinder to a fine powder.

Grind the onion, cilantro, dill, garlic, Thai chilies, into a fine paste in a food processor.

Saute all the dry ingredients, in oil. Then add the meat/ proteins saute till browned, followed by the wet ingredients paste.

Heat coconut oil in a pressure cooker, add the curry leaves and powdered spices to it and brown for about a minute. Add mutton and brown the meat. Add adu lasan, potatoes, salt and just enough water to prevent burning of the ingredients and cook for 30 minutes or longer till the meat is fully cooked.

In a thick bottomed pot boil Basmati rice for about 10 minutes in water and salt, drain the rice rinse with cold water, and add the cooked meat and potato from pressure cooker and cook on low flame for about 15 minutes covered with a kitchen towel stretched under the lid to absorb the extra moisture.  Serve hot with chopped cilantro as garnish. Enjoy

80 Biryanis around the world

Best Biriyani Around the world and its Origin
Biryani was originated in Iran (Persia) and it was brought to South Asia by Iranian travelers and merchants. Local variants of this dish are popular not only in South Asia but also in Arabia and within various South Asian communities in Western countries.

The spices and condiments used in biryani may include, but are not limited to, ghee, nutmeg, mace, min, pepper, cloves, cardamom, cinnamon, bay leaves, coriander, mint leaves, ginger, onions, and garlic. The premium varieties include saffron. For a non-vegetarian biryani, the main ingredient that accompanies the spices is themeat—beef, chicken, goat, lamb, fish or shrimp. The dish may be served with dahi chutney or Raita, korma, curry, a sour dish of eggplant (brinjal) , boiled egg and salad.

The difference between biryani and pullao is that while pullao may be made by cooking the items together, biryani is used to denote a dish where the rice (plain or fried) is cooked separately from the thick sauce (curry of meat or vegetables). The curry and the rice are then brought together and layered, resulting in a dish of the contrasting flavors of flavored rice (which is cooked separate with spices) and intensely flavored sauce and meat or vegetables.

What differentiates a Biryani from a Pilaf is that in a Biryani, the rice and meat with vegetables are cooked in layers whereas in a Pulao, the rice is mixed with the meat and vegetables and cooked together. Pilaf appears to be native to India, whereas Biryani is the Mughal influence in the Indian Subcontinent.

Hyderabadi Biryani

Non-vegetarian Hyderabadi biryani is savored in all parts of India and forms an integral part of Indian cuisine. The Nizam’s kitchen boasted of 49 kinds, which included biryani made from fish, quail, shrimp, deer and hare. The most famous of all, Hyderabadi Biryani is called the “Kacchi Yeqni” Biryani as both the marinated meat and the rice are cooked together.

Non-vegetarian Bhatkali biryani is a special biryany savored in all parts of coastal Karnataka and forms an integral part of Navayathcuisine. The Bhatkal’s biryani evolved from the Bombay biryani which was further refinedto give a distinct color taste and flavour. Bhatkali biryani can be of various kind, which include biryani made from either mutton, fish, chicken, beef, or shrimp. The biriyani is quite different from others across India in that the onions are used in larger proportions compared to other regions. The dish is cooked with the meat and onion based sauce being at the bottom of the cooking pot with a thick layer of rice on top, the rice and meat are mixed before serving. Local spices such as cardamom, cloves and cinnamon are used to get the distinct aroma.
Click to Down load full article
Kacchi Biryani

Kacchi Biryani is a special preparation of the dish. It is called ‘Kacchi’ because this style originated in the Kutch region of the Subcontinent.[Kacchi Biryani is same as Kacchi Yeqni” means raw marinated meat cooked with rice] It is cooked typically withgoat meat (usually ‘khasi gosht’, which is meat from castrated goats and often simply referred to as mutton) or with lamb, beef and rarely with chicken. The dish is cooked layered with the meat and the yoghurt based marinade at the bottom of the cooking pot and the layer of rice (usually basmati rice) placed over it. Potatoes are often added before adding the rice layer. The pot is usually sealed (typically with wheat dough) to allow cooking in its own steam and not opened till ready to serve. The challenge in the art of cooking kacchi biryani is to cook the meat till tender without overcooking the rice. When serving up the dish the chef takes a bit of rice from the top layer and meat from the bottom layer and deftly serves it up together. A boiled egg and mixed salad often accompanies the dish. This is one of the most popular delicacies of old Dhaka, Bangladesh and Hyderabad, India. It is featured in wedding feasts in Bangladesh and is usually served with borhani, a spicy drink.

Lucknowi (Awadhi) Biryani

Lucknow and biryani have an almost symbiotic relationship. The Lucknow (Awadhi) biryani is the footprint that the Muslims of theMughal Empire left on the northern part of India. It originated in the village ‘Bare Next’ and although it originated in the North, Virani Biryani has also picked up flavors of the South. The Awadhi Biryani is also known as “Pukka” Biryani as the rice and meat are cooked separately and then layered. Its taste is diffrent from the other places. It cooked into the big patilas of Tamba.In the last time of cooking they put some ashes on the lid of patila/Degh to all round cooking.

Moradabadi Biryani

This type of biryani is only found in the Moradabad city of the state of Uttar Pradesh in India. It is also known as Moradabadi Yakhni Biryani. This is so because, it is prepared with pre cooked meat boiled with spices(masalas and khushboos), which is known as Yakhni(meat stock). A slightly different version of this biryani is also found in Delhi, which is made up of slightly different spices and a different variety of rice. A special thing about this biryani is that it is flavoured with nutmeg, mace and Butter chillies(locally known as “pili Mirch”), which are not widely used in the Delhi version of the Moradabadi Biryani, and this makes it different.

Calcutta Biryani

The third in the list of famous Biriyanis, Calcutta or Kolkata biryani evolved from the Lucknow style when Wajid Ali Shah, the lastnawab of Awadh was exiled in 1856 to the Kolkata suburb of Metiaburj.[3] But he did not forget bringing his personal Chef with him as he was very particular about his food. Due to recession Aloo (Potato) had been used instead of meat. Later on that has been an iconic difference in Calcutta Biryani, though meat is also served along with it. In addition, Calcutta biriyani is much lighter on spices (Masala) than compared to other Biryani’s.

Sindhi Biryani

The Sindhi biryani variant of Biryani is very popular in Pakistani cuisine and Biryani of all types are eaten in all parts of Pakistan and the world. In Pakistan Biryani enjoys substantial popularity, particularly in the cities of Karachi and Hyderabad, where the chicken version is popular. Most Biryani cuisines in Pakistan combine elements of Sindhi Biryani such as the common use of Yogurtrecipes. The national flag carrier, PIA, also serves this cuisine for most of its western bound flights to give foreigners a feel of Pakistani cuisines.

There is also another meat free version prepared in the Punjab and northern areas of Pakistan that has proved quite popular and to meet the dietary requirements. The dish offers the usual local vegetables as well as a sour yogurt to cool off the stomach from the spices.

Memoni Biryani

Memoni biryani was developed by the Memon ethnic group and is very similar to Sindhi Biryani. It has variations though, among families, as do most biryanis, though the Bantva Memons community most commonly makes biryani in this form. Memoni biryani is made with lamb, yogurt, fried onions, and potatoes, and less tomatoes compared to Sindhi biryani. Memoni biryani also uses less food coloring compared to other biryanis, allowing the rich colors of the various meats, rice, and vegetables to blend without too much of the orange coloring. Memoni biryani is especially notable in Karachi, Pakistan.

Tahari

Tahari, Tehri or Tehari is the name given to the vegetarian version of Biryani and is very popular in Pakistani and Indian homes. In Bangladesh, Tehari refers to Biryani prepared by adding the meat (usually beef) to the rice as opposed to the case of traditional Biryani, where the rice is added to the meat. In Kashmir tahari is served out-doors on roads and streets. This is done so that a traveler, who may be hungry, can eat this to satisfy his hunger.
The Kozhikode Biriyani variant of biryani is very popular in Kerala cuisine introduced by Muslims. This preparation is popular across the coast of Kerala—the Malabar region particularly. The biriyani may contain beef, chicken, mutton or fish as the main ingredient. The biriyani is quite different from others across India in that the rice used is generally mixed with ghee to produce a very rich flavour. Although local spices such as nutmeg, cashew, cloves and cinnamon are used, there is only a small amount of chilli (or chilli powder) used in the preparation making the dish much less spicy in comparison to other biriyanis from across India. It is also known as Malabar biriyani, which is the made all along the Malabar area in Kerala from Kozhikkodu (Calicut) to Kasargod, with minor or no taste variation.

Danbauk

In Myanmar, biryani, known in Burmese as danpauk/danbauk or danpauk htamin , is popular. Popular ingredients are cashew nuts, yogurt, raisins and peas, chicken, cloves, cinnamon, saffron and bayleaf. In Burmese biryani, the chicken is cooked with the rice.Biryani is also eaten with a salad of sliced onions and cucumber. In Yangon, there are several restaurant chains that serve biryani exclusively. It is often served at religious ceremonies and luncheons. Biryani in Myanmar utilizes a special rice grown domestically rather than basmati.

Thai Biryani

In Thailand, Thai Muslims have popularized a local variety of the dish, known as Khao mok, which is popular throughout the country. Chicken and beef are the most common form but there is also a goat version that is eaten almost exclusively by the Muslim population. Along with Thai Massaman curry (Musulman Curry) and satay it is one of the most notable Muslim Thai dishes. Biryani is also another name for heena.

Sri Lankan Biryani

In Sri Lanka Biryani is most popular amongst Muslims and is usually served with chicken, beef or mutton. In many cases, Sri Lankan biryani is much spicier than most Indian varieties. Popular side dishes include Acchar, Malay Pickle, cashew curry and Ground Mint Sambol.

A popular form of biryani uses string hoppers as a substitute for rice. It is often served with scrambled eggs or vegetables.

Dam Pokht/Dam-pokhtak

During the Safavid dynasty, a dish called “Berian Polo” was made with lamb or chicken, marinated overnight – with yogurt, herbs, spices, dried fruits like raisins, prunes or pomegranate seeds – and later cooked in a tannour oven. It was then served with steamed rice.

In its more original form, in some cities the dish is known as “Dam Pokht/Dam-pokhtak“. The compound in Persian means “steam-cooked”—a reference to the steamed rice that forms the basis of the dish. This name is still in common use in Iran alongside “beriani“. In Southeast Asian countries such as Burma/Myanmar, this older, general Persian term is in common use, as ‘danpauk‘.

In the central Iranian city of Isfahan, Berian is made with cooked mutton or lamb, which is stewed and minced separately, and then grilled in special small round shallow pans in an oven or over a fire. The meat is generally served with powdered cinnamon in a local bread, usually “noun-e taftoun”, but also occasionally “noun-e sangak”.

Iraqi Biryani

Al Biryani is one of many famous dishes from the traditional Iraqi kitchen. It is widespread in Iraq as well as many other middle eastern countries. It is also very popular and considered a staple cuisine throughout the Kurdish territories. Different variations of biryani can be found in the different regions of Iraq. It is believed that the cooking style of “Dum” or “cooking in steam” style of cooking has its origins in Arabia.Typically with Iraqi biryani the rice is usually saffron based with either lamb or chicken being the meat or poultry of choice. Iraqi biryani is usually quite mild in terms of its spicyness when compared to its south-east Asian variants. Some variations include vermicelli or mixed nuts and raisins spread liberally over the rice.
Malaysia’s Nasi Beriani
In Malaysia and Singapore, the dish is called Nasi Beriani or Nasi Beryani or Nasi Briani or Nasi Minyak. It is commonly served with Rendang dish and Sirap Bandungbeverage especially during wedding receptions of Muslim Malays community. Nasi Beriani Gam, a special version of the dish is famous and favourite in the southernMalaysian state of Johor, especially in Muar and Batu Pahat.

Singapore

In Singapore, the dish is called Nasi Briyani by the Malays or simply Briyani by the Indians (note the different spelling and pronunciation: “briyani” as opposed to “biryani”). It is a very popular dish amongst the local population, especially Singaporean Indians and Malays, being a choice serving at weddings of both these communities. There are also speciality restaurants, commonly in Little India and Arab Street, and also regular Indian Muslim food stalls in coffee-shops all over the island that serve several types of briyani; distinctly Indian or Malay. The very common types come in either the chicken, mutton or fish versions, always accompanied with Achar (a pickled combination of cucumbers, onions, red chillies and pineapples) or Raita and a hard-boiled egg (in South Indian versions only). There are also Afghan, Iranian and Turkish manifestations of this dish available in some restaurants.

Filipino Dish

There’s a version of Biryani in the Philippine’s Pampanga region on the northern island of Luzon and in the predominantly Muslim areas of the southern island of Mindanao and the Sulu archipelago. The Kapampangan Nasing Biringyi is related to the Malay Nasi Beriani, see Kapampangan cuisine.

In the southern island of Mindanao, biryani style rice dishes are served during big celebrations.

Thallapakatti Briyani

This variety of briyani is quite popular in south India particularly in Dindigul, Tamil Nadu.There are quite a number of eateries serving this type of briyani. Thallapakatti literally means turban in Tamil.

Dindigul Biriyani
Originating around Dindigul in Tamil Nadu, India is prepared using a small rice called seeraga samba and with special ingredients.

Shrimp Biryani
Shrimp Biriyani ~ Also it called Baluchi Biryani.

This particular variation of Biryani brings out the tender and delicate flavor of shrimp. Unlike other kinds of biryanis, it’s quicker to prepare and does not require long hours of complex marinating procedures. It’s usually served with a side of baingan masaledar.

Fish Biryani

The Fish Biryani is has same spices as Sindhi Biryani or Shrimp Biryani and uses different varieties of fish instead of shrimp,beef, mutton of chicken. In Europe and North America, salmon is the most popular fish used in Fish Biryani. It is also known as fish khichdi in Britain.

Daal Biryani

The Daal Biryani is offers the addition of Daal to the ingredients of vegetable biryani. Addition of daal along with basmati rice, colorful vegetables, spices and fragrance enhances nutritional value to make it a sumptuous dish.
Other Types

Bangladeshi home-made beef biryani

Iraqi Biryani (as served in Amman,Jordan)

A Pakistani version of the Bombay biryani.

Sri Lankan Chicken Biryani

Chicken Dum Biryani

Sindhi biryani from Pakistan

Iranian Biryani’s (Isfahan)

A dish of Burmese biryani (locally known as danpauk),
as served at Kyet Shar Soon in Yangon, Myanmar

Nasi Biryani sold in Bukit Batok,Singapore

A fish biryani cooked in Pakistani style

Sabudana Kichdi (from cookbook)

Sabudana Kichdi
Sabudana Kichdi

Cooking time : 20 mins
Serves :2

Ingredients

  • Sabudana/ sago 1 cup
  • Potato 1
  • Green chilli 3
  • Lemon 1/2
  • Peanuts 3 tblsp
  • Ghee 1 tblsp

To Temper

  • Ghee 1 tsp
  • Jeera 1 tsp
  • Mustard (optional) 3/4 tsp
  • Curry leaves 1 sprig

Method

  1. Wash sago well and soak it overnight with water just enough to immerse the sago. The next day morning, all water should have got absorbed by the sago and it will be soft and fluffy.
  2. Boil potatoes and cube it and keep aside.In a non stick pan, add ghee and temper with mustard if desired and then jeera, followed by curry leaves. Add the cubed potatoes, little salt and fry for a minute.
  3. Add the sago, required salt and stir well. Add ghee if needed and keep in medium flame for 4- 5 minutes, until transparent and soft. Make sure you stir to avoid sticking to the bottom. Add crushed peanuts (roasted).
  4. Give it a stir and lastly squeeze the lemon and toss well. Garnish with chopped coriander leaves.

Notes

  • The sago should get soaked well, then only it gets cooked easily too. So make sure you soak atleast 8 hours.
  • Do not soak in more water. Just wash and add water to immerse the sago. Otherwise if you add more water, then becomes gooey.
  • After you add sago and keep frying, as the sago gets cooked, it turns transparent. Make sure all the sago gets cooked.
  • As it gets cooked, tends to be sticky but dont worry, it wont be too sticky.
  • Mustard is purely optional. So you can avoid it.
  • If you over cook the sago and keep frying, after turning transparent, it again starts to turn white.
Sabudana Khichadi

Sabudana Khichadi (Sago Rice)

Sabudana Khichadi
Sabudana Khichadi

Sabudana Khichadi

Sabudana khichadi is an Indian dish made from soaked Sabudana (Sago). It is usually prepared in western parts of India especially in Gujarat & Maharashtra. In the major towns of Maharashtra like Mumbai, Pune and Nagpur, it is available as street food and is widely enjoyed by everyone throughout the year. It is the dish of choice when somebody is observing a fast during Navratri. Tapioca is soaked for some time and then is fried with cumin seeds, Rock salt, red chili powder, green chillies and other optional ingredients such as fried peanuts etc. Khichdi is usually garnished with coriander leaves.

Sago is nearly pure carbohydrate and has very little protein, vitamins, or minerals. The addition of Peanuts to Sabudana Khichadi adds to the protein, vitamins and minerals content making it a complete dish. The Sabudana Khichadi is filling in nature and has a high energy content, therefore, it serves as ideal food during fasting.

Recipe

Ingredients:

1 cup sabudana(sago)
1/2 tsp Sugar
2 Green Chillies chopped lengthwise
1/2 cup peanuts
1 boiled and peeled potato
2 tsp Oil
1 tsp Cumin seeds
1 Pinch Hing (asafoetida)
2 tbsp grated fresh Coconut
1 tsp Lemon juice
Salt to taste
Few Coriander leaves
Few Curry Leaves

How to make sabudana khichidi :

Washing And Soaking:
Wash the sabudana in water 2 -3 times. Then soak them in water just enough to cover the top of the sabudana. Use a flat bottom vessel for soaking. Soak the sabudana in water for 6 – 8 hrs before you plan to make the khichdi. Every 2 – 3 hrs fluff them with the help of a fork. Later if you feel that the sabudana still has a hard center then sprinkle some water on them and wait for 30 mins for them to get soft. Fluff again with a fork and check. Repeat the process till you get perfectly soft centered pearly sabudana. Each and every pearl will be soft and well shaped. Also the sabudanas will double in volume.
Chop the potatoes into small cubes.
Heat the oil/ghee in a pan and add cumin seeds and hing. When the cumin seeds crackle add the green chillies and curry leaves.
Add the chopped potatoes and stir well. Let them cook till they are light brown on the outside. Add sabudana mixture and mix gently. Let it cook for 10 – 15 mins stirring occasionally and scraping the sabudana layer from the bottom of the vessel. When the pearls get translucent and shiny sabudana is ready.
Then add crushed peanuts, sugar and salt. Stir and make sure every thing gets mixed well.
Add the grated coconut and garnish with coriander leaves.
Sprinkle some lemon juice over it and serve hot.