Maska Netflix Film

The upcoming Netflix original, directed by Neeraj Udhwani, is due to be released this March.

Maska = Butter.

A bun-maska heritage snack with hot tea was immortalized by Zarthoshti-Irani cafes. Brun Pao is the bread !

Starring Shirley Setia as Persis & Prit Kamani as Rumi who as Rumi shows Persis, a photographer, around Mumbai. Rumi sets out for auditions hoping to become a movie star while escorting Persis around the city with breaks for bun maska in between.

The song during the bun-maska breaks, echoes the Parsi-Irani motto on life: khavanu, pivanu, majja ni life (life of eating, drinking & fun)!

Parsi Food Special | Jimmy Boy | Foodie & The Feast

Jimmy Boy’s Parsi Food Special

Parsi Food Special | Jimmy Boy | Foodie & The Feast

Parsi or Irani cafes are an integral part of Bombay’s diverse food culture. Food apart, they present an interesting mix of history & nostalgia. In this video, our host Arjun visits Jimmy Boy, one of the city’s most iconic restaurants, & dives deep into the culinary experience called Parsi Cuisine. Do watch!

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#ParsiFood#JimmyBoy#FoodieAndTheFeast

Vegetarian and Non-Vegetarian Parsi Food

Doordarshan on Parsi Cuisine

@Parsis are predominantly in Mumbai and the west coast of India, #DelhiGate is home to a #Parsidharmsala which has the @Parsi #firetemple in its precincts and displays the culture and flavor of the @Parsicommunity. The misunderstanding that #Parsifood is generally #nonvegetarian is dispelled when @Charlesthomson helps himself to sumptuous vegetarian #Parsithali and an unusual #Parsichai very similar to #Iranichai . @Parsifood explored by @CharlesThomson are #Dhansakdal, #Patramapaneer#paneervandaloo, #vegnanuachar, #SarkanuKachumbar , #Ravaiya, #Parsiroti, etc.. Team: – @Anchor @CharlesThomson Producer: – Shrabani Dasgupta Research: – @CharlesThomson Shrabani Dasgupta Camera: – Haridhan Bezbaruah, Satyanjay Sahoo Editor: – Ankit Juyal Graphics: – Pratiksh Pulatsya Montage: – Tathagat Assistance in Production: – Om Prakash & Umesh Barakoti Executive Producer: – Pradeep Agnihotri Acknowledgement: – Rustam Restaurant Overall In charge: – P K Subhash Delhi Doordarshan.

Yazdani Bakery

There are many Irani Bakeries in Mumbai, India. You must have heard of the Kayani Bakery, but have you heard of the Yazdani Bakery?

Yazdani Bakery is an Irani cafe or Persian style bakery in Mumbai, India.

The bakery was opened in 1953 by Meherwan Zend, an Irani baker. All products in the bakery are handmade, and baked in diesel ovens. The bakery draws a lot of visitors, particularly international visitors especially Germans. The building, built in the early 20th century, was originally a Japanese bank, which was later sold off. On 11 December 2007, the bakery was felicitated by Maharashtra governor SM Krishna the Urban Heritage & Citizens Award.

Old-school bakery/cafe offering Persian breads, baked treats & chai in simple, colorful surrounds.

Address: 11, 11A, Cawasji Patel Rd, Kala Ghoda, Fort, Mumbai, Maharashtra 400001, India

The Story Behind One Of Mumbai’s Oldest Standing Eatery That Belongs To A Yazidi Family: Yazdani Restaurant & Bakery.

Parvez Irani could be any old man sitting on the counter of a restaurant collecting cash. He’s so much trained in his trade that the best of corporate employees could be put to shame with his no-nonsense demeanour and a poker face determined to get work done well. He can be quite intimidating at first, but it’s his eyes that say a different story. Literally, a different story, because his eyes have a sharp hint of grey in them, a trait of the Yazidi community from the West Asia.

Someone once told me that Parsi and Irani bakeries are different, and asked Parvez the same to clear my doubt. Parvez immediately rubbished it and said, “The only difference between us is that the Parsis came 1200 years ago and we came about a hundred. But we’re the same people and every ritual and practice we follow is exactly the same,” he shares with us.

Travelling through the time

Entering Yazdani bakery is like stepping into a time warp. You’re immediately transported into what would look like the 1950s, exactly when the bakery was established. The narrow lane near the Horniman Circle, Fort was really busy on the Tuesday afternoon we visited.

The lane itself mirrors the good ol’ Bombay, but swanky Mercs and posh BMWs passing through the lane are major old-world-charm killers. The bakery, on the other hand, has a wall full of posters and advertisements from the yesteryears, with grandfather clocks hung on two walls. Even the menus displayed outside and inside are written with a chalk on a wooden blackboard.

Parvez tells us that when Babri Masjid was demolished, leading to riots in 1992 in Mumbai, Parvez recalls that Yazdani was the only open bakery in that area, providing food to those stranded and homeless.

“No police or politician made any attempt to come and shut us down. And this support from the people still stands with us,” he tells us proudly.

This is evident when we look around the place that is so sturdy and teeming with regulars and the frequent knells of ‘Bun-Maska-Chai” booming through the room.

Something old, Something new

The first Starbucks café in Mumbai had opened in Horniman circle’s fancy Elphinstone building in 2012, and lives up to the hype of its name – a comfortable, classy café with a perpetual coffee aroma for the company. It’s air conditioned, unlike Yazdani bakery which is barely fifty meters away from the international franchise outlet.

And yet, Yazdani has a large and loyal fan following. May be it’s the feeling of having time travelled into a classic Irani restaurant in Mumbai, or simply the dollops of maska in the bun-maska they offer, Yazdani is full of character – just like your favourite old book lying rugged on your shelf.

Parvez’s father had set up Yazdani Bakery & Restaurant in 1950, which Parvez joined in 1959. “People used to be so large hearted back then. My father used to give away food to the poor just like that,” Parvez gestures ‘giving away’ with his skinny, wrinkled hands. “Sometimes, people would not have enough money and even then my father would let it go. The Nehru government had hiked the rates of maida and there was not much of a scope for profit. But still, my father said that the difference of one naya paisa should go into the stomach of the customer and not our pockets. Since then it became a norm to give the leftovers to the poor. This, was until we could afford a new fridge,” Parvez laughs and points at one standing at the corner of the restaurant.

Parvez’s family has been into baking for a long time. He tells us that his ancestors were bakers in Iran and were bakers after they came to India. His grandfather had opened a bakery somewhere in Mumbai, where his grandmother used to make bread while his grandfather sold it. Yazdani was later set up in 1950 after his father decided to let go of a partnership business and set up his own.

British architecture under the blue sky

The structure of this bakery with its sky blue exterior and red painted roof stands alone among the elegantly carved British architecture on one side and neat commercial buildings on the other. And it’s surprisingly bigger on the inside – huge table to knead dough and large ovens to bake, and still, so much of room left that one could get their dance rehearsals done while the bread baked in the ovens. Yazdani bakery still uses an old style bread cutter, which is quite fascinating but efficient nonetheless. Stacks of hot dog buns are perhaps the only embellishment in the otherwise faded blue interiors and high vaulted ceiling above.

It looks like the Irani bakeries of Mumbai are living on borrowed time from three different generations. They serve the same dishes they did back then, and have people loving it, but are slowly being swamped by a different generation who loves polished wooden floors and a crowd that loves imitating an accent.

The speciality of the bakery – bread pudding usually gets only hours after it is made.  So we sort of made ends meet with an egg puff, bun maska and chai. There’s a lot more they offer – the apple pie, carrot cake, fiery ginger biscuits and muffins – all of which almost get over by the end of the day. Parvez’s son Tirandaz may be slightly less perky than his father, but still, has an interesting perspective regarding the death of the Irani café culture in the city. “The new cafés that are taking over the city are very fancy and have more facilities, but I wish that old places like these are retained and managed well. Our coming generations are so much in awe of the westernised world that they will voluntarily not take over the family business or manage the bakery. I would still wish that this bakery went on forever,” he tells us.

Is the change good?

Places like the Yazdani bakery are rare. When nobody provided livelihoods to people, the bakeries and restaurants did. Less than a dozen people work in Yazdani, and have been for almost all their lives.

Irani bakeries and cafes may look ordinary from the outside and may seem mundane to those who are ignorant to the beauty of the antiquated, but always have something fun to tell. Right from the exteriors to the people who visit it, Yazdani takes you on a trip to a less polished, raw and ragged Mumbai – the one that told tales of its initiation, survival and how it still stands undeterred and moves on but still retains its glamour.

Source: https://www.indiatimes.com/news/india/the-story-behind-one-of-mumbai-s-oldest-standing-eatery-that-belongs-to-a-yazidi-family-yazdani-restaurant-bakery-326632.html

Apple Pie
Apple Pie

Quick and Easy Parsi Malido Video and Recipe

Video

Recipe

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2 oz canola oil

2 oz butter

1 cup coarse semolina

1/2 cup bisquick

1 1/2 cups sugar

1 1/2 cups water

Garnish

2 oz chopped / slivered almonds

1 oz raisins

1 tbsp Ghee or Oil

2 tsp vanilla essence

2 tbsp rosewater

1 tsp ground cardamon

1 tsp ground nutmeg

pinch of rock salt

Method

In a large non-stick vessel, heat the oil and butter over low heat

Add the semolina and saute for 10 minutes until golden brown.

Add Bisquick and continue sauteing for 3 more minutes.

Caramel – in a small pot, heat 2 tbsp of the sugar and melt into a golden brown syrup. Take care not to burn the sugar. Next lower the heat and add the rest of the water. Bring to a boil and shut off the heat. The syrup should be “1 string” consistency.

Add the syrup, vanilla essence, cardamon, nutmeg, rock salt to the semolina and Bisquick. Be careful because there will be a froth rising and can boil over! This is why you need a large pot. Cover quickly and let it cook for 30 seconds.

Garnish: In a separate pan, heat the ghee/oil and fry the raisins on low heat till plump. Add the chopped/slivered almonds and fry for 5 seconds. Cool.

Spread garnish over the malido and serve warm.

This malido will keep well in the refrigerator for 2 weeks. You can freeze for 6 months and de-frost, warm and use it.

Papri / Daran recipe for Malido adapted from the Vividh Vani cookbook.

Papri and Daran for Malido

This recipe was adapted from the cookbook: “An Adventure in Exotic Parsi Indian Cooking by Nergis Karanjia and Nergis Unwalla (click on link to purchase)

Akuri – Traditional Parsi Akuri made the old fashioned way and with the old fashioned taste!

Recipe
Ingredients
4 eggs
1 onion chopped very fine
1 finely chopped tomatoes
1/4 cup fresh Coriander (kothmir) chopped (optional)
1  green chili finely chopped
2 tsp pieces of fresh finely chopped garlic and ginger or ginger-garlic paste
1/2 tsp of turmeric (haldi)
1/2 tsp each Coriander and Cumin Powder (dhanajeeru)
1/2 tsp Red chili powder
Salt to taste
Method
Fry onion till pinkish brown, add tomatoes.
Stir well and see that tomatoes are tender
Next add the ginger & garlic paste.
Stir well then add all the dry powder spices. Saute until the oil comes up than lower heat to lowest possible.
Beat eggs with a fork in a new bowl. Beat till frothy. Now add beaten eggs to the pan  and stir cooked to the consistency of scrambled eggs.
Serve to the egg consistency you desire. I like it runny and soft, some like it well-cooked and hard.
BREAKFAST: Spicy Scrambled Eggs – Akuri

My daughter Roshni says: After years of observing and searching and finally finding the right vessel in Ahmedabad, I have finally achieved Parsi akuri just like my grandmother’s! (yes, the pot/pan makes a difference). Akuri is basically scrambled eggs.

Akuri is basically scrambled eggs. You can have it for breakfast. Serve it with Rotli or toasted bread.

  • The way you make each dish changes based on the method and process used in cooking the eggs.

  • Ingredients  change the flavor of the spicy scrambled egg dish.

  • You can make it spicy, sweet and savory as in Bharuchi Akuri with dry fruits.

  • You can use akuri as a filling as in Akuri Pattice or simply rolled up in a Burrito, Rotli or Taco.

  • You can use it as a filling as in a sandwich (2 slices of buttered bread with akuri and grilled)

Recipe

Ingredients

  • 4 eggs

  • 1 onion chopped very fine

  • 1 finely chopped tomatoes

  • 1/4 cup fresh Coriander (kothmir) chopped (optional)

  • 1  green chili finely chopped

  • 2 tsp pieces of fresh finely chopped garlic and ginger or ginger-garlic paste

  • 1/2 tsp of turmeric (haldi)

  • 1/2 tsp each Coriander and Cumin Powder (dhanajeeru)

  • 1/2 tsp Red chili powder

  • Salt to taste

Method

  1. Fry onion till pinkish brown, add tomatoes.

  2. Stir well and see that tomatoes are tender

  3. Next add the ginger & garlic paste.

  4. Stir well then add all the dry powder spices. Saute until the oil comes up than lower heat to lowest possible.

  5. Beat eggs with a fork in a new bowl. Beat till frothy. Now add beaten eggs to the pan  and stir cooked to the consistency of scrambled eggs.

Serve to the egg consistency you desire. I like it runny and soft, some like it well-cooked and hard.

Great for diabetics and protein rich diets

I’m linking this recipe to Fiesta Friday #286, co-hosted this week are Mollie @ Frugal Hausfrau and Laurena @ Life Diet Health.

 

Kumas Cake Video and Recipe

Recipe by Rita Jamshed Kapadia

Makes 24 pieces

Ingredients

  • 6 oz salted butter (melted)

  • 2 cups sugar

  • 5 eggs

  • 1/4 cup grated blanched Almonds for cake mix

  • 1 cup wheat flour

  • 1 cup rava (fine grain semolina)

  • 1/2 cup cake flour or baking plain flour

  • 2 tsp baking powder

  • 1 tsp salt

  • 3 tsp cardamom powder

  • 2 tsp nutmeg

  • 1 1/2 cup yogurt (Measure the yogurt and keep in glass container at room temperature covered, the day ahead.)

  • 5 -7 strands of Saffron (see video for use of saffron)

  • 1/4 cup grated blanched Almonds for Garnish

Method

  1. On the day of baking Grind 1/2 tsp saffron and add to yogurt. Keep aside this is your wet mix.

  2. Prepare a 13 by 9 inch glass tray by applying melted butter and sprinkling flour.

  3. Sift and combine the flours in a large bowl.

  4. Add to the flour mix, 1/4 cup of almonds, baking powder, salt, cardamon and nutmeg. Keep aside this is your dry mix.

  5. In a mixer, cream the sugar and eggs. Add eggs one by one.

  6. Alternate and add the dry mix and wet yogurt saffron mix a small portion at a time (see video). Blend well.

  7. Pour out in the baking tray.

  8. Pre-heat oven to 350 degrees. Put tray in oven for 5 minutes till dough is hot. Now add all of the melted butter to the bubbly kumas, mix well and stir with a spatula till all the butter is absorbed. This is essential to a fluffy and moist kumas cake! 

  9. If desired sprinkle 1/4 cup of chopped almonds on top.

  10. Bake 350 degrees for 40 minutes in a pre-heated oven. Now and then check with inserting a toothpick or a blunt knife, to make sure kumas cake is baked. If the knife comes out clean without sticky dough, know the kumas is done.

Recipe is adapted from the cookbook of Niloufer Mavalvala.

Bring in the rain! Parsi Custom of bringing in rains by an community effort of collecting Rice, Dal and Ghee to make Khichri

You may have heard of the American Red Indian Dance for Rains, but have you heard of the Parsi Custom of bringing in rains by an community effort of collecting Rice, Dal and Ghee to make Khichri?

In Navsari (a small town in the Gujarat State of India) often referred to as the “Dharam Ni Tekdi”  Parsis has many of the traditional customs and practices that have over time been forgotten in other cities and town. The Ghee Khichri ritual on Bahman Mahino and Bahman Roj is one of them. Boys go from house to house, asking for rice, dal, oil, ghee and other uncooked products. The ladies pour generous portions in the collection bags. The boys are also splashed with water, which the boys have to dodge carefully.

Later this uncooked food is gathered at one location and is cooked into a collective feast.The whole endeavor is to ask the rain gods to come and bestow Mother Earth with water, after the long summer months in India.

A folk song is heard from moholla to moholla in Navsari:

GHEEE KHICHRI NO PAISO
DORIYAA NO RUPIYO
VARSAADJI TOH AAYEGA
DUMRI SHER LAAYEGA
DUMRI TAARI OAT MAA KHARA PAANINET MAA
OTTI KE POTTI
REL AAVI MOTTI
ALLAA GOCAL PAANI MOKAL
VARSAADJI NU PAANI TOH MITTHU NE MITTHU

Another song in Gujarati song for welcoming rains after a hot summer:

“Aavre Aav Varsad,

Dhebaryo Parsaad,

Uunni uunni rotli,

ne karela nu shaak! “

Translation:

“Come oh come rain,

Manna water from the heaven,

Enjoy with us, our warm rotli,

and karela vegetables “

Song and Music:

Click here for a Aryuvedic Khichri Recipe

Click here for Vaghareli Khichri Recipe

See a NEWS Video in Gujarati by Doordarshan.

Thanks to ParsiKhabar.net for video

Sheek Kababs

Recipe

Ingredients

1 lb Turkey minced
2 eggs
4 Tbsp Cashew Nut powder for binder
1 tbsp Cumin powder
1 tbsp Chili powder
1 tbsp White pepper powder
5 tbsp Coriander fresh leaves finely chopped
1 tsp Garam masala
1 tbsp chopped green scallions (substitute onion powder if desired)
4 Tsp Vegetable Oil
2 tsp of Ginger and Garlic each finely chopped
1 tsp Salt to taste
Oil for basting

Butter for brushing on at end
5 Skewers

Method
Whisk the eggs, so all the yolk and egg whites are blended and frothy.
Add all the dry spices and whisk.
Using your hands, add to turkey mince and mix thoroughly with cashew powder.
Marinate for 10 minutes.
Make 10 long sheek kababs as shown in video.
Oil the swekers and place the sheek kababs in tray
Grill or bake at 450 F. till done. These do not need to be browned, just cooked through.

Enjoy with fresh salad, green onions and rice pulao.

Spritz some lemon juice on top if desired. Now, let’s party! Join Fiesta Friday #276 by adding your link. 

How to make Kumas – Kumas is an ancient cake from 18th century

We made a video to kick off  our “Parsi Cuisine Heritage Video Presentations”.

This video is of making the Parsi Kumas Cake, which is very forgotten but tasty parsi cake.

Our YouTube Channel is http://www.YouTube.com/TheParsiCuisine

Recipe Link: http://www.parsicuisine.com/kumas-cake/

Chicken Cutlets Parsi Style

So many people wanted me to make chicken cutlets and mail them within USA. However meats can spoil easily, we do not want to take the risk.

Here ia a VIDEO ON HOW TO MAKE THE CHICKEN CUTLETS. We hope you can make your own! :))

Recipe

by Rita Jamshed Kapadia

Makes 18 approx based on the size

Ingredients

  • 1 lb ground chicken mince
  • 4 Cups boiled and mashed potatoes
  • 1/2 cup fresh, washed, finely chopped coriander leaves
  • 1/4 cup fresh, washed, finely chopped mint leaves
  • 2 Onions finely chopped
  • 4 Green peppers finely chopped
  • 1 tsp ginger-garlic paste
  • 1 tsp turmeric
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1 tsp black pepper
  • 1 tsp garam masala
  • 1 tsp cumin powder
  • 1 tbsp chili powder
  • 1 tbsp coriander powder
  • 1 cup of plain breadcrumbs
  • 3 eggs
  • Oil as needed

Method

  1. Mix all of above ingredients ( follow video for best results)
  2. Make flat round cutlets about 1/4 inch thick and roll in breadcrumbs
  3. Refrigerate for 1/2 hour
  4. Beat eggs till frothy
  5. Heat oil in a non-stick pan on medium heat
  6. Did the breaded cutlets into egg and immediately put in the pan to fry
  7. Make sure the cutlets have space between them for best results
  8. Spoon hot oil on top, and then check for color.
  9. Fry golden brown on one side, flip and repeat.
  10. Drain on paper towel and serve hot
  11. Cutlets will keep for 4 days in refrigerator. You can freeze them wrapped individually in foil and keep for 2 months.

To make the Cutlets Lacy, dip last in egg and be generous with the egg. Spoon more egg froth on top at last moment to make the frills.

Serve with  Tomato Gravy (recipe HERE), Ketchup or Sriracha Sauce

Home made Ghee or Clarified Butter

Ghee is easy to love. It’s unbelievably delicious, like ultra-rich Irish butter that’s been gently caramelized and transformed into a smooth spread. It’s also shelf-stable and has a generously high smoke-point, making it pretty much the ideal cooking oil. Oh, and did we mention its distinct flavor and deep roots in well-established Ayurvedic practices?

Ghee is clarified butter, a.k.a. butter that has been simmered and strained to remove all water. In France, clarified butter has uncooked milk solids, yielding a product with a very clean, sweet flavor. In comparison, ghee is cooked over low heat until the milk solids have a chance to start to brown lightly, creating a slightly nutty, caramelized vibe. It is shelf-stable, with a high smoke point and deeply nutty flavor. Ghee has played a key role in Ayurveda for centuries, where it’s prized for its anti-inflammatory, digestive, and therapeutic properties. It even appears in the Vedic myth of creation, when the deity Prajapati created ghee from nothingness and poured it into the fire to form his offspring.

Why we love it:

Clarifying butter by removing water creates a higher smoke point—about 465º F compared to butter’s 350º F. The clarifying process also removes casein and lactose, making ghee suitable for the dairy-sensitive. The absence of water even makes ghee shelf-stable, meaning it can be stored without any refrigeration for extended periods of time. Just be sure to keep the jar away from steaming stoves, food, and anything else that can introduce bacteria. (If you start to detect an off flavor, scrape off the top level, and store it in the fridge instead.)

Ingredients

2 Sticks of unsalted butter
1 pot (thick bottom)
Strainer
Jar for storing

Method

  1. Heat the butter in the pot on very low heat.

  2. Wait till the foam, fat and salt floats on top.

  3. Immediately strain into your jar.

  4. Cool completely.

The Carlisle Gleason Public Library Presentation and Feature Story

The event was wonderful! It was a pleasure to share my history and heritage with the Carlisle town folk, who attended this even with the cold weather in January. There was a ice and snow storm going on outdoors, but warm, hot and spicy food was had by all indoors.

The library staff was so thoughtful on that day. I had prepared about 9 dishes and had platters to carry! They provided a cart which we wheeled into the elevator and went up. The table was setup with the tablecloth and chairs were laid out. It is an blessing to be part of this lovely town.
I was so happy to get a lot of questions, and a very good discussion ensued with people sharing stories and experiences.  Everyone munched on the food and it made me proud when they took some samples home. All food samples were made using the recipes from my cookbook.

After the event, my daughter said it all! “Great lessons learned and tasty food shared! Great job, Mom!!! “

The Carlisle Mosquito (newspaper of the town of Carlisle, MA) published a feature interview, you can read it here. (click on link). Thanks Anne! 

Jim took a video and photographs:

 

 

 

Rita’s Secret Cashew Lamb Curry revealed!

Rita’s Secret “Kaju Mutton ” Cashew Lamb Curry revealed !

Lamb can be substituted with Mutton.

Kaju is a Indian word for Cashew. (Cashews can be substituted with Almonds)

Cashew Lamb Dish

Ingredients

  • 4 lbs boneless Lamb

Marinate lamb

  • 10 tsp. Ginger Garlic paste

  • 3 tsp Salt

  • 1 tsp turmeric powder

Fry in hot oil

  • 2 medium onions grated

  • 2 tomatoes chopped

  • 1” 5 pieces of cinnamon

  • 9 cloves

  • 7 cardamom pods cracked open a little

  • 9 Black peppercorns

  • Oil as required

Grind to paste

  • 1 cup Cashew nuts

  • 1 cup Yogurt

Dry Spices 

  • 1 tsp Garam Masala

  • 4 tsp red curry powder

  • 1 tsp salt

  • 1 tsp Dhanna Jeera powder

  • 1 tsp cumin

  • 1 tsp turmeric powder

  • 1 tsp red chilli powder

  • 1/2 tsp saffron (optional)Add to taste: Salt and  about 1 cup thick cream at the very end.

Method 

  1. In a pan heat 3 tblsp oil and sauté onion till translucent.

  2. Add the cinnamon sticks, cardamon and cloves.

  3. Stir well and brown the onion.

  4. Grind Cashews and Yogurt into a paste

  5. Saute Lamb pieces for 15 minutes on medium heat.

  6. Add the dry spices now with the yogurt and nut paste, marinated lamb and saute 10 more minutes. Add more oil if needed.

  7. Give it a good stir and add the saffron, enough water to get a good gravy and close the pressure cooker lid.

  8. Bring the pressure cooker to the first whistle on medium heat  and then and let it cook on the lowest flame till the lamb is cooked to desired tenderness. (15 – 20 minutes).

  9. Remove Lamb curry and add the cream.

  10. Sprinkle with potato matchsticks (sali) and serve.

 Tip: For added flavor you should roast and soak saffron in little hot milk.

Serve with hot  Basmati rice or Naan or Roti.

Seekh Kebab

Ingredients

1 lb Turkey or Chicken minced

2 Eggs
1 tbsp. Cumin (Jeera) powder
1 tsp Red chili powder

1 tsp White pepper powder
Salt to taste
Vegetable oil 4 tsp

4 tbsp. Cashew nuts(pounded)

5 tbsp Gram flour (besan)

2 tbsp. Ginger, Garlic each (finely chopped)
4 tsp Onions(chopped)
5 tbsp. Green coriander(chopped)
1 tsp Garam masala
Oil for basting
Butter for brushing

5 skewers

3 Lemons (cut into wedges)

Method
1. Whisk the eggs, add cumin powder, red chilli powder, white pepper powder, salt, and oil.
2. Add cashew nuts, gram flour, ginger, garlic, onions, green coriander, and garam masala.
3. Add to the mince and mix well. Keep aside for 10 minutes.
4. Mix well. Divide into 10 equal portions.
5. With wet hands, wrap two portions along each skewer.
6. Keep 2 inch between each portion. Prepare 5 skewers like this.
7. Roast in a moderately hot tandoor or charcoal grill for about 6 minutes until golden brown in color, or roast in a preheated oven at 150°C (300°F) for 8 minutes, basting with oil just once.
8. Remove from skewers and brush with butter.
9. Serve hot, garnished with onion rings and lemon wedges

Famous Parsi Fish with Green Chutney, Patra ni Machhi

A very popular recipe of the Parsi Cuisine.

Patra ni Machhi

 

Recipe

Ingredients
4 banana leaves

1 kg fish

Juice of 1 lemon

3/4 tsp salt

Chutney:

1 grated coconut

6 green chillies

50 gm coriander leaves with stems

1 tbsp mint leaves

1 tsp ground cumin seeds

1 tsp sugar

Salt to taste

Method
Marinate the fish in lime juice and salt for 30 minutes.

Coat the fish pieces on both sides with the chutney.

Wrap the fish pieces in banana leaves and secure with string.

Steam bake for 10-15 minutes. Serve hot.

For the chutney:

Combine all the chutney ingredients and grind until a smooth paste is formed.

Other Patra ni Maachi Recipes

Shrimp Patio

Prawn Patio

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ingredients

3 Onions finely chopped
2 lbs Prawns or Shrimp
3 Green chilles finely chopped
2 tsp Garlic finely minced
1 bunch Kotmir ( coriander leaves)
1 tsp Haldi ( tumeric) powder
1 tsp red chilli powder
1 tsp Cumin seeds
1 tsp dhanya powder
2 inch piece of Jaggery
5 Tomatoes finely chopped
1 tsp Salt 

Method
1. Marinate the prawns with salt and haldi. Keep it aside.

  1. Now in a pan add oil when hot add  jeera seeds. Bring to a crackle and  add onions,  garlic and fry till little brown.
  2. Now add jaggery and green chillies. when the jaggery melts add tomatoes.
  3. Suate and make it all soft, then add red chili powder, haldi, dhanya and  salt.. When the masala is cooked well add the prawns
  4. If you wish, add water but its not needed.
  5. When prawns are cooked garnish with coriander leaves.

Shrimp Patio is ready.

Serve with Dhan dar.

Purchase our Cookbook on Seafoods

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Bhonu Prakash: Zoroastrians & Food in Historical Perspective – Daniel Sheffield, Princeton University

Bhonu Prakash: Zoroastrians & Food in Historical Perspective – Daniel Sheffield.

Dan Sheffield is a professor at Princeton University, New Jersey, US

Dan’s website: www.dansheffield.com

Video Contents:

  • The Banquets of Persepolis and Ctesiphon

  • Food is integrally tied to our identity. As we say You are what you eat.

  • Eating practices of Zoroastrians in Persepolis flavored with Saffron, Cardamom, Cumin and Jafran.

  • Indian Sweets (Meva and Mithai) in Parsi Gujarati.

  • Gujarati Foods of Khaja, Ladu, Jalebi, Ghevar, Ghari, Puri, Dudh Pak, Lapsi, Dry fruits and Fruits

  • Sakar-panir (Parsi Mava ni Boi)and 2 lumps of sugar is a fish given to a girl who is going to be

    engaged. (Maneckji Limji Hataria on the customs of Iranian Zoroastrians)

  • Mediaval Gujarati Varanaka Literature and adaptations of the Shahnama

  • Sir-O-Sedab

  • Persia Rivayats and Ritual Concentration of Meat

  • Gahambar

  • Indian Zoroastrians query of eating “Rhino” Meat

  • Regulations of preparing Meat just like Jews and Muslims

  • Not eating meat on Bahman Roj, Mohor Roj, Gosh Roj and Ram Roj

  • Prayers to be said before slaughter of animal

  • Toddy, Bhakra

  • Cookbook with recipe of Pineapple Pulao from the persian language Muglai cookbook “The Essence of Edibles and Potables” “Khushalat al-Mukalat va’l Mashrubat” written for a certain Khurshedji Sahib in 1838

  • Tomatoes, Potatoes, Chilli pepper, Papaya, Cashews, were used only recently as nineteenth century

  • The First Parsi Cookbook VivivdhVani by Meherbai Jamshedji Wadia  published in Bombay, 1903. (re-printed here)

  • Zenobia Zorabian’s Lagan nu custard,  Akuri, Sali Boti, Auntie Freny’s Dhanshakh, Souffle which are critical elements of Parsi Cuisine.

Parsi Cuisine at Inaugural Event at the Dar-E-Mehr in Pomona, NY : Karma Kafe – An Indian Bistro

Mehernosh Daroowalla and his team were proud to cater the lunch for the inauguration.

Originally from Mumbai, India, Mehernosh has a business background and a passion for the food business. Mehernosh opened his first restaurant, India On The Hudson, quickly followed by Karma Kafe, both located in Hoboken, NJ and known for specializing in regional Indian cuisine.

Mehernosh began experimenting with authentic Parsi Cuisine for small gatherings and catering. Word spread and he became the caterer for many Parsi functions and ZAGNY events.

505 Washington St

Hoboken, NJ

 Phone: (201) 610-0900

karma karma2 karma3 karma4 karma5 karma6 karma7

This is part 2 of Parsi Cuisine at Inaugural Event at the Dar-E-Mehr in Pomona, NY Series.

See Sheroo Kanga’s Malido – Parsi Cuisine at Inaugural Event at the Dar-E-Mehr in Pomona, NY 

Strangers in the Night

Played and sung by Zane Commissariat.

Dhansak in the Night . . . . .

[Sing to the tune of – ‘Strangers in the Night’]

Dhansak in the night . . .
Sali boti ‘nay Daru pi ne tight

Curry-ma kolmi . . . mothi-mothi

Then everything is all right . . . .

When there’s dhansak in the night.

Doobie-doobie-doooo

Kanda Papeta per eedu *

Nashta per dahi sev ‘nay elchi keru

But everything will be all right . . . .

When there’s dhansak in the ni-i-i-i-i-ght

A Parsi peg or two

With chicken farcha will do

Papata ma gosh, ‘nay some Irani oosh

But everything will be all right . . . .

When there’s dhansak in the ni-i-i-i-i-ght

Masoor pau is nice

With doodhi-gosht ‘nay rice

Charvelu eedu, Maiji-e maakhan ma kidhu

Pun, daru pi ne tight – bawaji feels all right

When there’s dhansak in the ni-i-i-i-i-i-i-ght!

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