Audh - forgotten but now remembered

Audh – forgotten but now remembered

Audh Parsi Audh 

Audh is a better mood elevator than a bar of chocolate! The primary ingredient in this is rice flour and coconut milk.

It is one Parsi  dessert which is forgotten but now remembered. Just made it again today for Father’s Day

Do you remember this? 

Hint: Audh is served as Dessert.

Ingredients:

  • 1 1/4 cups fine rice flour
  • 2 cups icing sugar
  • 225 grams ghee
  • 2 cups coconut milk extracted from 1 large coconut
  • 3 1/2 cups hot water
  • 1 1/2 cups rosewater
  • 1 tbsp almonds, blanched and slivered
  • 1 tbsp peeled cardamom, coarsely crushed
  • A pinch of salt

Method:

  1. Boil water, add rice flour and sugar gradually, stirring continuously.
  2. Add one-third of the ghee to flour mixture, keep on medium heat and stir till absorbed.
  3. Add coconut milk, salt, rosewater and ghee alternately till all are absorbed.
  4. Keep stirring and cooking till mixture forms a ball and leaves sides of pan.
  5. Sprinkle half the almonds on a greased tray and spread mixture over it.
  6. Smooth out with a greased wooden spoon or greased hand and cover with cardamoms and remaining almonds.
  7. Press into mixture.
  8. Cool, cut into diamond shapes and serve.

 

Fish wrapped in Banana Leaf with delicious Chutney: Parsi Patra ni Maachi

While vacationing in Dahanu a couple of years back, and driving back to Gujarat from the Maharashtra state. I saw fisher women selling promfrets, pronounced locally as pamplets on the roadside. Dahanu is a coastal town and a municipal council in Palghar district in the state of Maharashtra, India. It is located 110 km from Mumbai city.

They had freezers in their lovely home to store their catch.  However the fresh fish would be sold within 2 hours and if you wanted any pamplet or prawns you better rush there in the morning.

These fishermen and fisher women live along the coast line of Dahanu with their houses on the beaches. Living a simple life they make a living catching the ocean bounty. I talked with the mother and father whose son was coming to USA to study. Now that’s progress !

Patra ni Maachi chutney is very easy to make. With fresh cilantro, lemon juice and other ingredients.  The same chutney can be used to make chutney sandwiches at a later time.

Banana leaves are found in US in many Indian, Korean and Chinese Stores. The word “Patra” literally means “Leaf” in gujarati. “Maachi” means “Fish”. So do not be intimidated by the strange words, translated, the dish is  Fish wrapped in Banana Leaf with delicious Chutney.

I have found  pamplets in US in HMarts, called by a different name – plammuro. These are a bit yellow and not as white as found in India. They do have the same look, taste, texture and feel.

Some wiki facts:

Pomfret
Brama brama.jpg
Atlantic pomfret, Brama brama
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Class: Actinopterygii
Order: Perciformes
Suborder: Percoidei
Superfamily: Percoidea
Family: Bramidae
Genera[1]
Brama
Eumegistus
Pteraclis
Pterycombus
Taractes
Taractichthys
Xenobrama

Pomfrets are perciform fishes belonging to the family Bramidae. The family includes about 20 species.

They are found in the Atlantic, Indian, and Pacific Oceans, and the largest species, the Atlantic pomfret, Brama brama, grows up to 1 m (3.3 ft) long. Fish meat is white in color.

Several species are important food sources for humans, especially Brama brama in the South Asia. The earlier form of the pomfret’s name was pamflet, a word which probably ultimately comes from Portuguese pampo, referring to various fish such as the blue butterfish (Stromateus fiatola). This fish also called as ‘Maanji’ (ಮಾಂಜಿ) in Tulu and paplet in Urdu, Marathi and Nawayathi.

  • Several species of butterfishes in the genus Pampus are also known as “pomfrets”.
  • Some species of pomfrets are also known as monchong, specifically in Hawaiian cuisine.
  • Above referenced from Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

I found a substitute fish here in the US called “Palmunaro” in H-MART. They are similar to pamplet from India.

  Recipe for Patra ni Maachi with Leeli Chutney.

  • 2 large Pomfrets weighing together 900 gms. (other fish like Salmon can be substituted)
  • 2 teaspoons salt

Grind together for chutney:

  • 10 green chilies
  • 3 cups washed and chopped Cilantro (Kothmir)
  • 1 teaspoons cumin seeds
  • 6 large cloves garlic
  • 2 teaspoons sugar
  • 1 teaspoons salt
  • 2 teaspoons lemon juice
  • Banana leaves or Foil
  1. Remove head of fish if desired and cut each fish into 6 slices.
  2. Cut large enough portions of banana leaves or foil to wrap each slice of fish.
  3. Hold each piece of banana leaf over a flame a few seconds to soften leaf and center rib.
  4. Grease one side of each portion of leaf or foil.
  5. Using about 1.5 teaspoons salt per fish, rub salt into each slice of fish.
  6. Coat each slice of fish with chutney.
  7. Lay a slice of fish on the greased side of piece of banana leaf or foil and roll it up.
  8. Tie with thread.
  9. Do the same with other slices of fish and steam or bake for 30 minutes or till fish is cooked.

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VIDEO : https://youtu.be/8ymliZBw7QU

The place of Tea in Indian Culture

Indians love tea, they are crazy about it – and they even have a special word for it – chai.

India is one of the largest tea growers in the world. Tea is grown in the north and the south – in exotic places like Munnar in Kerala, Darjeeling, Assam, and Nilgiri Mountains. The tea gardens are a sight to see. Beautiful terraces are carved into the earth and from far they look like manicured gardens. Tea from Darjeeling and Assam is world famous for its aroma and taste.

Tea was introduced in India by the British during early 1900’s, those were early days of the British Raj. Large swaths of land were converted for mass tea-production.  Ironically, the British introduced tea in India to break the Chinese monopoly. Tea was originally consumed by the westernized Indians, but it became widely popular over time. Today, looking at the popularity of tea one cannot tell of its origins from China.

But the story of story of tea in India goes beyond the tea gardens in exotic mountains and valleys, covered with mist and lush greenery. Tea is woven intricately into the Indian social fabric.

Chai is the common equalizer in India – from the rich to the poor. No matter what their position in life, an Indian relishes a cup of tea. The rich ones have their tea served in fancy tea-pots, delicate porcelain cups on well laid out tables with cookies and pastries. The not-so-affluent have it in more humble settings. But the joy and satisfaction is the same.

No matter where you go in India, even the remote village, you are likely to find a tea-stall, with a Chai-walla brewing the concoction, squeezing every last flavor. There is always a crowd of eager and tired folks waiting patiently for their chai. Tea re-vitalizes your body. It is a great anti-oxidant.

India has one of the largest railway networks in the world. Every train station has tea-stalls. Hawkers carry tea-buckets doling out hot cups to weary travelers as the trains pull into the train stations. One of my enduring memories growing up in India is traveling on the train in the sleeper-coach and waking up to the lilting calls of the tea-hawkers.

There are many stories of how tea brings people together. When you visit friends – tea and snacks are probably the most common offering. A cup of tea bonds friendships and heals differences. A guest rejecting an offer of a cup of tea may even hurt their feelings. The ultimate bonding is sharing a cup of tea – between two people – albeit in different saucers. When you visit a commercial establishment, as a sign of respect for the customer, tea is offered. Read more in my cookbook for Tea.

Recently, I was invited to speak and present “The Place of Tea in Indian Culture and the Kerala Tea Gardens” at the Boston Athenaeum. Here is a short synopsis. I am delighted that my Cookbooks were displayed and showcased in the museum! Thanks Hannah Weisman!  Hannah is the Director of Education at Boston Athenaeum.

The museum is a historical place and encourages historical books. The Boston Athenaeum is steeped in history. Founded in 1807, the Boston Athenæum is one of the oldest and most distinguished independent libraries and cultural institutions in the United States.

Tea / Chai Recipes:

 

Sev

Seven Ways to Celebrate Navroz 2020




Navroze / Nowruz / Nooruz is on March 21, 2020.

Commemorated in a grand and elaborate fashion, preparations for  Navroze begin well in advance. Houses are cleaned to remove all the cobwebs and painted new. They are then adorned with different auspicious symbols, namely, stars, butterflies, birds and fish. New attires are ordered and made especially for the festival. On the day of  Navroze, people dress in their new and best clothes and put on gold and silver kustis and caps. The doors and windows are beautified with garlands of roses and jasmines. Color powders are used for creating beautiful and attractive patterns, known as Chok or rangoli, on the steps and thresholds. These intricate and creative patterns display the sanctity of the festivals. Moreover, fish and floral motifs are a favorite among rangolis and considered highly auspicious.

Guests are welcomed by sprinkling rose water and rice, followed by applying a tilak. Breakfast usually consists of Sev (a vermicelli preparation roasted in ghee and choc-a-bloc with dry fruits) which is served with yogurt and enjoyed by young and old alike. After breakfast, it is time to visit the Agiary or Fire Temple to offer prayers. Special thanksgiving prayers, known as Jashan, are held and sandalwood is offered to the Holy Fire. At the end of this religious ceremony, all Parsis take the privilege to exchange new greetings with one another by saying ‘Navroze Mubarak’. Back home, special delicacies are made marking the lunch as an elaborate and delicious affair.

Various Parsi dishes, such as Sali boti (a mutton and potato preparation), chicken farchas, patrani machchi (fish steamed in a leaf), mutton pulao and dal, kid gosh and saas ni machchi (a thick white gravy with pomfret) jostle for space on the table. However, the most significant dish that forms an integral part of Navroz celebrations is pulav (rice enriched with nuts and saffron, aka biryani). Besides, plain rice and moong dal are a must on this day. Desserts too are not behind in terms of variety, the most important being falooda. It is a sweet milk drink made from vermicelli and flavored with rose essence. Lagan-nu-custard, or caramel custard, is another favorite on this occasion. The entire day is spent by visiting friends and relative and exchanging good wishes and blessings.

Suggested Menu for the Navroz day:

sev 002

Breakfast 

 Parsi Sev Sweet Vermicelli (shown above)

 Parsi Ravo (Sweet cream of wheat)

BREAKFAST: Akuri
BREAKFAST: Akuri

Akuri

Lunch

 

 Dhan Dal (Steamed Rice with plain dal) with Khari Fish

Fried Fish
Fried Fish

Fried Pomfret  (Tareli Maachi)

 

Dinner

Chicken with Apricots / Jardalu ma Marghi
Chicken with Apricots / Jardalu ma Marghi

 Chicken with Apricots / Jardalu ma Marghi

Dessert

DESSERT: Lagan nu Custard - garnished with almonds, pistachios
DESSERT: Lagan nu Custard – garnished with almonds, pistachios

 Lagan nu Custard

Batasa – a favorite biscuit snack. Good with Tea or Coffee anytime! 

Batasa

 

Dhun Dar

Tea of India – Chai

Chai is the common equalizer in India – from the rich to the poor. No matter what their position in life, an Indian relishes a cup of tea. The rich ones have their tea served in fancy tea-pots, delicate porcelain cups on well laid out tables with cookies and pastries. The not-so-affluent have it in more humble settings. But the joy and satisfaction is the same.

A good cup of chai is the answer to body aches, headaches and the morning blues.

Call it “Chai” or “Choi” or “Cha” or “Tea” the joy of having chai is awesome.

Ingredients for 2 cups of chai (tea)

1 tsp black tea (use 2 tsp if stronger tea is desired)

1 tsp Lemon Grass (Leeli Chai) leaves washed and finely chopped

1 tsp Mint leaves washed and finely chopped

1 cup water

1 cup milk

Method

Boil water, lemon grass and mint (see video)

Add milk (see video)

Make the Ukaro (see video)

Pour into cups and enjoy piping hot.

Chai with Lemon grass + Mint

I am curious why some Parsis say “choi” instead of “chai” (tea) ?

https://amzn.to/2s9Puhp

Dhanshak Masala

Dhanshak Masala

While preparing the Parsi delight Dhanshak, you need not bother about curating various spices for enhancing the taste. Just use Badshah Dhanshak Masala and let your guests keep guessing the secret of your culinary skills. We ensure to keep the authenticity of its traditional taste intact in this spice mix.

Parsi Mutton Cutlets

By Rita Jamshed Kapadia

Ingredients

250 gm mutton mince

1 tsp ginger paste

1 tsp garlic paste

1 green chilli, coarsely ground

1/2 tsp turmeric

1 tsp red chilli powder

1/2 tsp clove-cinnamon powder or garam masala

2 Tbsp potatoes, boiled and mashed

5 mint leaves , chopped coarsley

1 Tbsp chopped coriander

Salt to taste

Bread crumbs, to coat

4 eggs, whisked (to coat the cutlets)

Oil to deep fry

Method
In a bowl take the mince and massage it with your hands for 3-4 minutes.

Now add the ginger paste, garlic paste, green chilli, turmeric, red chilli powder, clove-cinnamon powder, mashed potato, pudina, dhaniya and salt. Mix it well.

Make medium sized round patties (makes around 5-6). Coat the cutlets with bread crumbs from both sides. Refrigerate for 30 minutes.

Whisk eggs. Coat the refrigerated cutlets in the egg mixture. Deep fry in hot oil till golden brown from both sides.

Serve with homemade authentic parsi tomato gravy (click for recipe).

Squeeze some lemon juice on top if you want.

Sample recipe from Rita’s Cookbook, click here to order

White Pumpkin Preserve

White Pumpkin Preserve “Kohra no Murambo”

“Kohra (White Pumpkin)  Murambo (Preserve)” recipe is included in the cookbook .

White Pumpkin Preserve is flavored with hints of cinnamon, cardamom and nutmeg with an amber caramel color which come from hours of gently simmering the grated pumpkin.

Truly,  this Kohra no Murambo is a labor of love in the finest traditions of the Parsis.  Kohru is white or orange pumpkin found in USA. Hence, I prefer to name it White Pumpkin Preserve in keeping with the traditions of the new land we have made our homes in.

The native Indians brought gifts of the autumn harvest to the Thanksgiving feast held with the Pilgrims. The Autumn Harvest of Sweet Potatoes, Yams, Butternut Squash, Green Beans, Peas, Cranberries, Potatoes, Corn, Apples, Pears, included varieties of Gourds and Pumpkins.

White Pumpkin Preserve for your Thanksgiving Table
White Pumpkin Preserve for your Thanksgiving Table

WHITE PUMPKIN MURUMBO (Pumpkin preserve or jam)

Ingredients

2 1/4 lb. round white pumpkin

Sugar Weigh grated pumpkin together with its water then weigh sugar equal to half the weight of the pumpkin.

4 inches cinnamon stick

3/4 tsp. mixed cardamom and nutmeg powder

Peel pumpkin, remove seed section then grate pumpkin.

Weigh grated pumpkin together with its water then weigh sugar equal to half the weight of the pumpkin.

Put sugar grated pumpkin and pumpkin water together with cinnamon stick in a large pan.

Heat on stove and bring mixture to the boil. Lower heat cover and cook 10 minutes.

Uncover pan and continue cooking on medium heat till all the liquid has evaporated and pumpkin is golden brown.

Sprinkle cardamom and nutmeg powder and mix. Cool thoroughly and store in air tight jars.

It keeps for several weeks. Refrigerate for longer storage.

Health benefits of Bay Leaves

Health benefits of Bay Leaves
Bay Leaves Dried

Many ladies add bay leaves to our foods, especially red meat and poultry meat.

Don’t know why bay leaves are added to food? When a woman asks why, she says: to flavor the food.

If you boil the bay leaves in a glass of water and taste it, it will have no flavor.

So why do you put bay leaves in the meat?

The addition of bay leaves to meat converts triglycerides to monounsaturated fats, and for experimentation and confirmation:

Cut the chicken in half and cook each half in a pan and place on one bay leaf, and the other without bay leaf and observe the amount of fat in both pans.

If you have bay leaves, there is no need for a pharmacy. Recent scientific studies have shown that bay leaves have many benefits.

Helps to get rid of many serious health problems and illnesses,

The benefits of bay leaf are: –

Bay leaf treats digestive disorders and helps eliminate lumps.

Heartburn

Acidity

Constipation

It regulates bowel movement by drinking hot bay tea.

It lowers blood sugar and bay leaf is also an antioxidant,

It allows the body to produce insulin by eating it or drinking bay tea for a month.

Eliminates bad cholesterol and relieves the body of triglycerides.

Very useful in treating colds, flu and severe cough as it is a rich source of vitamin “C”, you can boil the leaves and inhale steam to get rid of phlegm and reduce the severity of cough.

Bay leaf protects the heart from seizures and strokes as it contains cardiovascular protective compounds.

Rich in acids such as caffeic acid, quercetin, eigonol and bartolinide, substances that prevent the formation of cancer cells in the body.

Eliminates insomnia and anxiety, if taken before bed, helps you relax and sleep peacefully.

Drinking a cup of boiled bay leaves twice a day breaks kidney stones and cures infections …

Don’t read and leave – share to benefit

Cooking with the Parsis. - Delightful article from NYTimes. - http://www.parsicuisine.com/cooking-with-the-parsis/

Cooking With the Parsis

Cooking With the Parsis; Parsi: Indian Spices, Mideastern Cooking; Tehmina Alphonse’s Parsi Recipes

  • Method for Making Ghee
  • Kheema Kebabs (Spiced meatballs)
  • Mango Kulfi
  • Dhansak (Chicken with lentil puree)

By Craig Claiborne

PRINCETON, N.J.

WOULD YOU come to dinner?” Tehmina Alphonse asked. “I will prepare you the traditional meal of the Parsis in India. Our culture is very distinct from the rest of the Indian culture, although we have adopted a lot of the customs of the land that we call ours now. Cooking with the Parsis is unique in toe sense LIICL it combines Middle Eastern cooking with Indian spices and herbs providing tastes and flavors very typical the Indian subcontinent

Helping ourselves from a platter of dhansak, warming, pacifying dish made with a velvet‐smooth puree of lentils and spiced chicken, we learned far more about aspects of Parsi‐Indian culture than’we had ever known.

The Parsis are followers of Zoroaster, one of the great teachers of the East. He is to his followers Jesus is to Christians and Moses is to Jews. The precise period of his birth is debated but, according to the Encyclopaedia Britannica (11th edition), some sources “place him 5,000 years after the Trojan War, [others] 6,000 years before the death of Plato,” who lived 300 years before Christ.

The encyclopedia adds that the religion of the Zoroastrians teaches them benevolence as the first principle and no people practice it with more liberality.

The Parsis emigrated to India from Iran in the ninth century during the time of the Asian conquest and were welcomed hospitably by the Hindu priests. No one knows, Mrs. Alphonse was saying, precisely what foods their ancestors brought with them to India, but they assimilated well and adopted well to Indian customs.

“This is, perhaps, the most typical of all Parsi meals, the foods that are hungered for the world over when Parsis travel,” she said.

“The name ‘dhansak,’ “ she went on, “derives from two words, ‘dhan,’ meaning rice, and ‘sak,’ meaning lentils; Actually, the main dish of the meal is the chicken with lentil purée and brown rice served separately. It isn’t brown rice as you know it in this country, but it is made with white basmati, or Indian rice, and the

color comes from browned onions and spices.”

Mrs. Alphonse speculated that the .dish might well have had its origins in a Persian dish, known in modernday Iran as adas polio ba morgh. It is made with rice, lentils and chicken, but is spare of spices other than a touch of turmeric. Dhansak is far more elaborate, with such Indian spices as cumin, coriander, cloves, cinnamon and chilies.

One of the compelling things about the meal served in the Alphonse home was its inspired marriage flavors. It involved fine juxtapositions of flavors—the delicate, subtle spiced lentil purée and chicken, complemented with cachumber, which is a simple, piquant “chutney” made with tomatoes and onions, green chillies, coriander leaves and a light lacing of vinegar.

That, plus kheema kebabs, Kebab, incidentally, is Persian word meaning meat or fowl, generally cooked over a charcoal fire. In this case they were ground meatballs about the size of Ping‐Pong balls, made with ground beef, chilies and spices.

Mrs. Alphonse said that though she now uses a great deal of beef, in her native India lamb is the basis of the vast majority of meat dishes.

The meal ended with seductive mango ice cream, smooth, satiny and creamy as if it had been handchurned, although it had been prepared in a standard home freezer. It is known as kulfi.

Our hostess, who became an American citizen last year, is married to a Haitian electronics engineer, Gerard Alphonse, who is a researcher at the nearby RCA David Sarnoff Research Center, The Alphonses ‘ have three children.

Mrs. Alphonse said that she encounters few problems in finding all she needs for her Parsi kitchen in Manhattan. On her visits to New York, which are infrequent, she stocks up on Indian spices from the small Indian enclave around 28th and 29th Streets and Lexington Avenue. Most of the foods come from the Kalustyan Orient Expert Trading Corporation, 123 Lexington Avenue between 2Sth and 29th Streets.

In addition, she receives, with fair frequency, a “care” package from her grandmother in Bombay, who taught her how to cook. Mrs. Alphonse’s mother, by the way, is a politician in Bombay and is deeply involved in charity work.

Mrs. Alphonse says that she likes highly spiced hot dishes. She learned early, she said, that some of her American friends were not equally enthusiastic about hot green chilies.

“The first meal I cooked I made to suit my taste,” she said. “A few bites later, all the guests were perspiring from the upper lips to the back of their necks. Since then I’ve been very careful about the use of chilies, red or green.”

Mrs. Alphonse asserts that she may have the only complete set of cookware from England by way of India. “My aunt passed through New York and Princeton several months ago,” she said, “and she was appalled that my kitchen wasn’t better equipped. When she got home she sent me all the utensils, mostly British, she had accumulated over the years.”

Put one pound (an arbitrary amount) of butter in a heavy saucepan and place it over low heat. When it melts, let cook about 45 minutes one hour. Do not cover and do not add any other ingredients including water. Stir often as it boils. Watch the butter carefully so that it does not darken or discolor. When the foam on the surface of the butter sinks to the bottom and the bottom is caramel‐colored, the butter is ready to strain. Pour the clear liquid through a very fine strainer. That is ghee. The solids that remain may be discarded, or you may add a 14‐ounce can of condensed milk and one‐half cup slivered, blanched almonds to the saucepan with these solids and cook until caramelized. Pour into a buttered dish. Let cool and serve as you would caramel candy..

2 tablespoons clarified butter or ghee (see method for making ghee) 1 cup finely chopped onion 2 tablespoons chopped fresh coriander leaves, optional 1 teaspoon chopped fresh mint or use half the amount dried 1 or 2 hot green peppers, seeded or not, finely chopped 2 teaspoons cumin seeds 2 teaspoons finely chopped garlic 2 teaspoons finely chopped ginger ½ teaspoon paprika 1 teaspoon garam masala, see note Salt and freshly ground pepper to taste 1 egg, beaten 1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce Oil for deep frying, optional.

1. Place the meat in a mixing bowl. 2. Melt the butter in a skillet and when it is melted, add the onion. Cook, stirring often, until lightly browned. Cool slightly. 3. Add the onion to the meat. Add the remaining ingredients except oil. The mixture may be used now, but it is best if left to stand two hours. 4. When ready to cook, deep‐fry the balls. Or preheat the broiler or preheat the oven to 375 degrees. Or prepare a charcoal grill. Arrange the meatballs on a baking dish and broil , or bake, turning as necessary. Or cook them on the grill, turning often. Cooking time will vary according to the method used. Cook until medium well done. Yield: About 26 meatballs. Note: Garam masala is sold in Indian markets including those in the vicinity of Lexington Avenue and 28th Street. 1 cup mango slices in syrupy, see note 1 cup mango, pulp, see note 1 14‐ounce can sweetened condensed milk 1 cup heavy cream 2 cups milk ⅛ teaspoon grated nutmeg ¼ teaspoon pure vanilla exxtract

1. Put the mangoes with syrup and mango pulp into the container of food processor or electric blender. Blend to a fine puree. Add the condensed milk.

2. Add the cream and milk and blend well. Add the nutmeg and vanilla extract.

3. Pour the mixture into small molds (in India there are special aluminum molds in individual sizes for freezing kulfi) and place in the freezer and freeze. Unmold and serve.

Yield: 8 or more servings.

Note: Mrs. Alphonse recommends the Alphonso brand of mango slices and mango pulp. These are available at Kalustyan Orient Expert Trading Corporation, 123 Lexington Avenue. Note, too, that the mango slices and pulp may he omitted and the contents of a threeounce package of ground almonds substittited. Ground pistachio nuts may be substituted for the ground almonds.

2 three – to – three – and – one half‐pound chickens, see recipe for chicken for dhansak) 2 cups toover dal (yellow lentils), see note 1 cup channa dal (yellow split peas), see note 1 cup masoor dal (red lentils), see note . ¼ cup val peas (dried field peas), see note ¼ cup mung beans (dried and split), see note Water to cover plus 2 to 3 cups 1 or 2 potatoes, about half a pound, peeled and quartered or cut into eighths 1 small eggplant, trimmed, or use a slice from a larger eggplant, weighing about one‐third pound 6 spinach leaves, rinsed well ½ cup cooked red pumpkin or use half a package frozen cooked squash 1 small sweet potato, about onequarter pound, peeled and quartered 4 scallions, trimmed and chopped 1 medium‐size onion, about six ounces, peeled and quartered 2 tomatoes, about . three‐quarters pound, peeled and chopped 2 or more teaspoons garam masala, see note 2 teaspoons finely chopped ginger 2 teaspoons finely chopped garlic ¼ teaspoon turmeric 2 to 4 green chilies, seeded or not, chopped, see note 1 cup chopped, loosely packed fresh coriander leaves, see note 2 bay leaves Salt and freshly ground pepper to taste

1. Prepare the chicken, which must marinate for a time, according to the first step in the recipe for chicken for dhansak. The cooking time for the chicken is about 40 minutes. The cooking time for the dhansak is one hour. Cook the two entities so that they finish at the same time. 2. Combine the three kinds of dal, the val peas and mung beans in a bowl and add cold water to cover to about one‐quarter inch above the mixture. Let stand one hour.

3. Empty the lentil mixture with the soaking liquid into a kettle. Add two to three cups of water or enough to cover the mixture about half an inch above the solids. Add the potatoes, eggplant, spinach, pumpkin, sweet, potato, scallions, onion, tomatoes, garam masala, ginger, garlic, turmeric, chilies, coriander and bay leaves. Add salt and pepper to taste. Remember that the spices indicated here will produce a mildly spiced dish. Add more spices according to preference.

4. Bring to the boil and cook about one hour, stirring often from the bottom to prevent sticking and burning. Remember that peas and beans tend to stick and burn easily. The lentils must be thick when ready, but if they become heavily thick. add a little water as necessary.

5. As the lentils cook, prepare the chicken according to the recipe for chicken for dhansak.

6. When both mixtures are done, purée the lentil mixture, using a food processor. Or put it through a food mill to produce a very smooth purée. Combine the lentil puree with the chicken pieces in a clean kettle. Stir in the chicken broth and heat thoroughly. Serve with brown rice, cachumber and chutney. Serve the kheema kebabs if desired.

Yield: 10 to 12 servings.

Note: The lentils, beans, peas and spices listed here are available at the Indian markets on Lexington Avenue and 28th Street, including Kalustyan Orient Expert Trading Corporation, 123 Lexington Avenue between 28th and 29th Street.. Fresh coriander is available in Chinese markets in Chinatown and the open‐air markets on Ninth Avenue, plus other sources where fresh Chinese and Indian produce is sold.

2 three- to three-and-one-half-pound chickens, each cut into eight pieces 2½ tablespoons finely minced garlic 2½ tablespoons finely minced fresh ginger Salt and freshly ground pepper to taste

1½ tablespoons clarified butter or ghee [see method for making ghee] 1 cup coarsely chopped onion 1 to 3 hot red peppers, depending on size and taste 2 teaspoons whole cumin seeds ¼ cup coarsely chopped fresh coriander leaves, see note 2 bay leaves 2½ teaspoons garam or dhansak masala, see note.

1. Put the chicken pieces in a bowl and add the garlic and ginger. Add salt and pepper. Rub the seasonings into the chicken pieces and cover. Let stand one hour.

2. In a heavy casserole, large enough to hold all th‐e chicken, heat the butter and add the onion. Cook, stirring often, until onion starts to brown. Add the chicken pieces and the remaining ingredients.

3. Cook, turning the pieces in the casserole so that they cook evenly. Cover and continue cooking, turning the pieces as necessary, until chicken is tender, about 40 to 45 minutes. Generally speaking, it will not be necessary to add water or other liquid to this dish. If the chicken becomes dry, however, add a littlE water.

Yield: 10 to 12 servings in dhansak. (Note: See note for dhansak.)

2 onions, about three‐quarters pound 5 tablespoons clarified butter or ghee (see method for making ghee) 1 teaspoon finely minced garlic 1 teaspoon finely minced ginger 1½ teaspoons whole cumin seeds 2 teaspoons Worcestershire sauce I teaspoon paprika 6 whole cloves 6 whole peppercorns 3 cardamon seeds 1 one‐inch length of cinnamon stick ½ teaspoon dried thyme 4 cups rich beef broth 2½ cups basmati rice (see note) or Uncle Ben’s regular, converted rice Salt to taste 1 teaspoon lemon juice.

1. Peel the onions and cut’ them into thin slices.

2. In a skillet, heat two tablespoons of butter and add the onion. Cook, stirring often, until the onions are nicely browned without burning. Remove from the heat.

3. Heat one tablespoon butter in kettle and add half the cooked onions. Reserve the remaining onions for garnish.

4. Add the garlic, ginger, cumin, Worcestershire sauce, paprika, cloves, peppercorns, cardamon seeds, cinnamon and thyme.

5. Add the beef broth, rice, salt and lemon juice. Bring to the boil. Cover and simmer about 20 minutes or until all the liquid is absorbed. Fluff the rice with a two‐pronged fork and stir in the remaining two tablespoons of butter. Serve on a platter garnished with the remaining cooked onions.

Yield: 10 to 12 servings. Note: Basmati rice is sold in Indian markets, including those in the vicinity.of Lexington Avenue and 28th Street.

Nan Khatai

Nan Khatai

These soft cookies are similar to the European dutch shortbread cookies.

I flavored them with Rose and Cardamon.

Very easy and fun to make. 

Makes 12

Ingredients

1 cup all purpose flour

1/2 cup confectioners sugar

1/2 cup unsalted butter (salted is fine but omit the pinch of salt)

1/2 tsp. double-acting baking powder

1 tsp. cardamom powder

1/2 tsp. rose essence (can substitute with 1 tsp rose water)

1 pinch salt

Method

Preheat oven to 330 F

Prepare baking paper with non-stick material or foil.

Mix flour, sugar, salt, baking powder and cardamom.

Add the butter and rose essence and knead lightly into a soft dough.

Form small balls with your clean hands and sightly flatten them.

Place them one inch apart on the baking tray and bake for 15 minutes. Watch carefully they do not turn brown. You want them light and white.

Cool and store.

Nankhatai Homemade, Wholesome and Authentic
Nankhatai Homemade, Wholesome and Authentic

Recipe from my cookbook Parsi Cuisine Manna of the 21st Century

Health benefits of sumac

Meet Sumac, the Superfood Spice That’ll Help You Fight Inflammation—and Bland Food—for Good

The ancient herb sumac—made from ruby-colored berries that are ground into a beautiful, coarse powder that bursts with color and flavor—has been underappreciated in American cooking (if you immediately thought of poison ivy, you’re wrong!) for centuries. We’re here to fix that.

If you grew up in a Middle Eastern household, however, you probably have a very different sumac story to tell. “You’ll know it as a souring agent that’s an excellent substitute for lemon or vinegar, and is great to use on kebabs, fish or chicken,” says Tenny Avanesian, an Armenian American Food Entrepreneur and Founder of Lemonette. “It’s been used to add tangy, fresh flavors in Lebanese, Syrian, Armenian, and Iranian cooking for many millennia, and you could not walk through a street food marketplace of centuries past (even today) without seeing it everywhere around you.”

According to Tenny, sumac is the secret ingredient in endless Middle Eastern mezzes, salads, rice dishes, stews, and kebabs. It’s also the primary element and focal point of za’atar, a very popular and timeless Middle-Eastern spice blend of sumac, oregano, thyme, sesame seeds, and marjoram. And thanks to its beautiful, rich, deep red color, sumac is the perfect finishing touch for dips, vegetables, grains, and more.

How to start cooking with sumac

Sumac is ideally used in place of (or in addition to) lemon juice or lemon zest when making dishes like salads, hummus, marinades or dressings, tzatziki, or baba ganoush. 

You can also sprinkle it atop basmati rice, grain salads, pita chips, or any type of flatbread (or use it as way to pump up the flavor of store bought breads or chips). Add it to roasted vegetables, fried or scrambled eggs, or incorporate it into roasted nuts. Rub sumac on meat, fish, or poultry—if you’re grilling them, even better. Shall we go on?

Yes. Because sumac also goes extremely well with mint. “Two salads in particular, Shirazi Salad (in Iranian cuisine) and the Fattoush Salad (in Arabic cuisine) both add sumac and mint to their dressings,” says Tenny.

Health benefits of sumac

Sumac is one of the most powerful anti-inflammatory spices out there. It ranks high on the ORAC chart, which means it’s packed with antioxidants and has the ability to neutralize free radicals that can cause cancer, heart disease, and signs of aging.

Sumac is also a beneficial ingredient for those with type 2 diabetes. Studies have shown that daily intake of sumac for three months will lower the risk of cardiovascular disease among people with type 2 diabetes.

Stainless Steel Round Indian Spice Box

Stainless Steel Round Indian Spice Box with 7 Containers, Kitchen Masala Dabba, Spice Container – Silver Color, 7.3 Inch

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Which Spice are you?

Zodiac Sign for Spices

I’m linking this recipe to Fiesta Friday #286, co-hosted this week are Mollie @ Frugal Hausfrau and Laurena @ Life Diet Health.

Mango Murraba (Parsi Murambo) Recipe

Celebrate  with this glorious Mango Murraba anyday. #mangoseasonison #ilovemangoes #mangoisthekingoffruits #mangolove #mango

Ingredients

1 kg semi-ripe mangoes (any variety, but for best results and taste, either alphonso, or, even better still, the `bottle’ mango, `batli keri’. Best to use are small green, totally unripe mangoes. But then add more jaggery, according to taste.)

White or red pumpkin can be substituted.

Peaches can be substituted.

200 gms jaggery (more, if mangoes very raw and sour. Can use sugar to substitute for jaggery, but the flavor will not be the same. If using sugar, I would suggest palm or cane sugar or raw sugar.)

1-inch piece of cinnamon

2 cups water (approximately)

Salt to taste (coarse salt or rock salt)

5 Cloves (optional)

2 Bay leaves (optional)

5 Black peppercorns(optional)

5 Cardamoms (optional)

Method

  1. Peel the mangoes, remove the seed and slice lengthwise. (Depending upon size of the mango, you can halve the lengthwise slices, as per requirement. Mango should be in chunky pieces, do not slice too thin.)

  2. Pour water in a heavy-bottomed pan. Add jaggery, cloves (optional), cinnamon, bay leaves (optional), peppercorns(optional), and cardamoms (optional) and cook over a medium flame, stirring occasionally. Once the jaggery has melted, add salt, mangoes, and cook over a low flame, stirring occasionally, being careful not to break the mango slices. Cook till a syrupy consistency is achieved, then remove from heat and cool completely.

  3. Serve as an accompaniment to papeta-ma-ghosh.

  4. The mango murabba (murambo)  can be stored in glass jars and refrigerated for one month.

  5. This is a yummy and fairly healthy snack for children, spread out on toast and butter instead of jam.

  6. Substitute Peaches or Apricots, pumpkin for variety !

Now, let’s party @ Fiesta Friday 

Coconut Mango Burfi – diamonds make the best display

Coconut Mango Burfi
Note: No artificial colors used.
This post and recipe were created for #SummerDessertWeek! I was sent samples by some of the sponsor companies but as always the opinions are 100% my own.
Ingredients

1/2 kg aamras (mango puree)
1/2 cup sugar
250 gm desiccated coconut
1/2 cup milk powder
1/2 tsp cardamom powder
1/2 cup of coarsely grounded charoli nuts and almonds (dry fruits)
1 tbsp pure ghee

Method

  1. Take a non stick pan and add mango puree aamras and sugar and give a good boil by continuously stirring for about 10 minutes
  2. Add desiccated coconut and mix well n keep stirring
  3. Add the dry fruits powder and cardamom powder and mix
  4. Add the milk powder and mix properly
  5. Add ghee and keep stirring till the mixture is soft and starts leaving the sides
  6. Empty the mixture in a greased tray and spread evenly n garnish with raisins and chironji and refrigerate for few hours
  7. Cut into desired shape (diamonds make the best display) and size.

Salted Lassi with Coriander and Cumin

Drink Indian Cumin Lassi

  • without sugar. Great for Diabetics. 

Salted Lassi is healthy and nutritious for your body. This drinks is like the indian chaas which is very good for the digestion. Enjoyed as a breakfast drink to cleanse the body of toxins.

Ingredients:

Plain Yogurt 1 cup

Water 1 cup
Coriander leaves 3
Cumin powder a pinch
Salt to taste

Method of preparation:

Wash coriander leaves and grind them with little amount of yogurt using a juice blender.
Add remaining yogurt, cumin powder, a cup of water, salt and blend again thoroughly.
Garnish with coriander leaves and serve immediately.

Do you measure?

Friday Fiesta co-hosts this week are Diann @ Of Goats and Greens and Petra @ Food Eat Love

Chicken Tikka Masala

INGREDIENTS

2 pounds skinless, boneless chicken breasts, halved lengthwise
6 garlic cloves, finely grated
4 teaspoons finely grated peeled ginger
4 teaspoons ground turmeric
2 teaspoons garam masala
2 teaspoons ground coriander
2 teaspoons ground cumin
1½ cups whole-milk yogurt
1 tablespoon kosher salt

3 tablespoons ghee (clarified butter) or vegetable oil
1 small onion, thinly sliced
¼ cup tomato paste
6 cardamom pods, crushed
2 dried chilies or 1/2 teaspoons crushed red pepper flakes
1 28-ounce can whole peeled tomatoes
2 cups heavy cream
¾ cup chopped fresh cilantro plus sprigs for garnish

2 Cups Steamed Basmati rice

METHOD
Combine garlic, ginger, turmeric, garam masala, coriander, and cumin in a small bowl.

Whisk yogurt, salt, and half of spice mixture in a medium bowl; add chicken and turn to coat. Cover and chill 4-6 hours. Cover and chill remaining spice mixture.

Heat ghee in a large heavy pot over medium heat. Add onion, tomato paste, cardamom, and chiles and cook, stirring often, until tomato paste has darkened and onion is soft, about 5 minutes. Add remaining half of spice mixture and cook, stirring often, until bottom of pot begins to brown, about 4 minutes.

Add tomatoes with juices, pureeing  them in mixer before. Bring to a boil, reduce heat, and simmer, stirring often and scraping up browned bits from bottom of pot, until sauce thickens, 8-10 minutes.

Add cream and chopped cilantro. Simmer, stirring occasionally, until sauce thickens, 30-40 minutes.

Skewer bite-size chicken pieces and grill on a Tandoor Oven or indoor/outdoor Grill or a 400 C oven for 10 minutes. Idea is to grill to a dark brown color and taste. (This is the secret to a good chicken tikka masala)

Add to sauce, and simmer, stirring occasionally, until chicken is cooked through, 5 minutes. Serve with rice and cilantro sprigs.

TIP: Chicken can be made 2 days ahead. Cover; chill. Reheat before serving.

FiestaFriday with Diann @ Of Goats and Greens and Jhuls @ The Not So Creative Cook

Grilled Tandoori Chicken

Sheek Kababs

Recipe

Ingredients

1 lb Turkey minced
2 eggs
4 Tbsp Cashew Nut powder for binder
1 tbsp Cumin powder
1 tbsp Chili powder
1 tbsp White pepper powder
5 tbsp Coriander fresh leaves finely chopped
1 tsp Garam masala
1 tbsp chopped green scallions (substitute onion powder if desired)
4 Tsp Vegetable Oil
2 tsp of Ginger and Garlic each finely chopped
1 tsp Salt to taste
Oil for basting

Butter for brushing on at end
5 Skewers

Method
Whisk the eggs, so all the yolk and egg whites are blended and frothy.
Add all the dry spices and whisk.
Using your hands, add to turkey mince and mix thoroughly with cashew powder.
Marinate for 10 minutes.
Make 10 long sheek kababs as shown in video.
Oil the swekers and place the sheek kababs in tray
Grill or bake at 450 F. till done. These do not need to be browned, just cooked through.

Enjoy with fresh salad, green onions and rice pulao.

Spritz some lemon juice on top if desired. Now, let’s party! Join Fiesta Friday #276 by adding your link. 

Bhakhra (Parsi Doughnuts)

Bhakhra (Fried Cakes)

DESSERT: Bhakhra

by Rita Jamshed Kapadia



Bhakhras are fried cakes and can be savored with a hot cup of tea or coffee.


Please use Caraway Seeds not shah jeera or any substitute. The flavor of caraway seeds is different. I get so many inquiries for where to get these. Many grandmothers in Ahmedabad swear by this flavor but they are hard to find.


I find Caraway seeds in Whole Foods, or a regular Super Market in USA in the spices aisle. Caraway is used in baking British dishes and have an European origin.

A parsi favorite of mine, I take any chance to make them for my family.

While travelling to India, the first chance I get get I head down to the Parsi Industrial in Ahmedabad to get some of their freshly made bhakhras.

In Udvada, I buy them from a small shop opposite the Atashbehram. These bhakhra are made with “Taari” (fermented toddy from a palm tree) an with caraway seeds.

Ingredients

3/4 cup whole wheat flour

1 cup all purpose bleached flour

1/2 cup sugar

1/2 cup fine semolina (Ravo)

1/2 cup ghee (clarified butter)

1 egg, beaten

2 tbsp. Yogurt or 125 ml toddy mixed with 1 tsp sugar and 125 ml warm water (Beer can be substituted for toddy)

1 tsp Caraway Seeds (optional)

Water as required

1 tsp powdered cardamom and nutmeg mixture

1/2 tsp salt


Oil for deep frying

Powdered Sugar for dusting (Optional Christmas Look)

Method:

Sift flour, semolina, spices and salt together.

Beat sugar and ghee together.

Add egg and mix well.

Add flour mixture, mix well with caraway seeds and add yogurt/toddy.

Beat to a stiff dough, adding water if necessary.

Cover with cling film or damp cloth and keep in a warm place for about 2-3 hours, till dough has risen.

Roll out about quarter-inch thick and cut into one-and-a-half-inch rounds with a biscuit cutter.

Bhakhra - Roll and cut
Bhakhra – Roll and cut

Deep fry and drain.

Bhakhra - Fried in hot oil. They puff up so always test for the right oil temperature.
Bhakhra – Fried in hot oil. They puff up so always test for the right oil temperature.

Cool and store in an airtight glass jar.

Wedding Pickle, Lagan nu Achar

Wedding Pickle

Lagan nu Achaar is a Pickle made from fresh carrots, ginger, garlic, raisins, apricots, spices, sugar, jaggery and balsamic vinegar. Sweet and Savory this pickle is a great condiment on the table.

Recipe available in my cookbook "Pickles, Chutney, Masala and Preserves"

Super Bowl Game Snack : Paneer Tikka

Served as an appetizer Paneer Tikka is very healthy for kids and adults alike. Go Pats!

Recipe featured on Cover of our Vegetarian Delights Cookbook. Purchase HERE.

INGREDIENTS :

  • 2 cups paneer cubes, about 1″ each

  • 2 tsp garlic paste

  • 2 tsp ginger paste

  • 1 tsp chaat masala

  • 2 tsp chilli powder tandoori masala

  • 1 tsp powdered black pepper

  • 1 tbsp salt

  • A few drops of red colour

  • 3 tbsp vinegar OR 1 cup yogurt

  • Oil for brushing

  • 1 lemon quartered and juiced (can substitute 1 tsp lemon juice)

  • 1 onion sliced into rings – for garnish (I don’t like onions so  made a bed of romaine salad lettuce and sliced tomatoes. Salt and black pepper sprinkled on top)

METHOD:

  1. Mix all the ingredients, except the garnishes, and leave for 20-30 minutes.

  2. About 20 minutes before serving, place the paneer on a drip pan and bake in the pre-heated oven for about 10 minutes. (Oven Temp: 400 F Degrees)

  3. Remove from oven, brush with oil and bake again for 10 minutes. Alternatively, you can grill on a griller or a tandoor or barbecue pit. (The drippings should definitely have a means of escape, or else the paneer will get soggy)

  4. Serve hot, garnished with lemon and onion rings

Step 1

Step 2
Step 3

Recipe Contest Winner: Pav Bhaji

Congratulations to our member
Erik Treasuryvala for his Pav Bhaji Masala and Pav Bhaji recipes.

Erik says – Pav Bhaji has its origins in the civil war of America in the 1860s. Read more here…

Erik is a member of the Facebook Parsi Cuisine (PC) group and regularly shares his creations with us. I am very impressed by his diligence and ability to create such mouth-watering foods. We wish Erik many successes in his cooking ventures.

 

 

Home made Pav bhaji Masala

Ingredients for 240 ml cup
2 small Black cardamoms or badi elaichi
2 tbps Cumin (Jeera)
4 tbps Coriander seeds (Dhaniya)
2 tsp peppercorns
3/4th tbsp fennel seeds (saunf)
6 red chillies
2 inch Cinnamon or Dalchini
6 cloves or Laung
1 tsp amchur powder (dry Mango Powder)

Method
1. Dry roast all the ingredients one after the other on a medium heat on a pan till they turn flagrant.

2. Add dry mango powder/ amchur powder to the hot pan to get a good aroma 

3. Cool the ingredients completely then powder in a blender if needed seive it

4. Store in airtight container.

Who Invented The Famous Indian Dish Called Pav Bhaji?

Pav Bhaji has its origins in the civil war of America in the 1860s. Because of the civil war, there was a huge demand for cotton. Due to this, the traders at the Bombay cotton exchange used to be very busy especially during the night when new cotton rates used to be telegram-ed from America. Thus they used to return home late and the annoyed wives would not serve them food. So to solve this problem the street vendors used to collect the leftover bread from the Jesuit priests and mix all the vegetables, mash them together and used to eat them with the bread and butter. Thus pav (bread) bhaji (vegetables) was born.

Thus from the humble beginnings, the street of Bombay to being a household item in the entire nation Pav Bhaji has come a long way.

Here are 5 different variants of pav bhaji 

1. Jain Pav Bhaji -no onion, no garlic version of the regular pav bhaji made using raw bananas instead of potatoes and mashed peas. This is available in Gujarat and parts of Maharashtra.

2. Kathiawar Pav Bhaji – region has local spices added to it, giving it a very distinct taste, and it is usually washed down with a glass of buttermilk.

3. Kada Pav Bhaji – is the same as regular pav bhaji except that the vegetables in it are not mashed up i.e. the chopped and cooked vegetables are kept intact, whole.

4. Punjabi Pav Bhaji – is loaded with whole spices (garam masala), excess butter and often accompanied by a glass of ‘lassi’. 

5. Kohlapuri Pav Bhaji – variation where red chilli powder is substituted by Kolhapuri kanda lasun chutney to make it a more spicy, garlicky version of the pav bhaji.

Pav Bhaji Recipe

by Erik Treasuryvala

Ingredients

2 medium potatoes approx 1.5 cups chopped
1/2 cup green peas 
3 cups chopped cauliflower 
1/2 cups chopped carrot
1 large onion chopped
1 tablespoon Ginger Garlic Paste
2 medium tomatoes chopped
1/2 cup chopped capsicum
1 teaspoon red chilly powder
1/4 teaspoon turmeric powder
1/4 teaspoon cumin-coriander powder
1 teaspoon ready made pav bhaji masala powder or homemade – see above
1 teaspoon lemon juice
Salt to taste
Butter for serving
2 tablespoons concentrate chopped coriander leaves
Pav (soft buns) for serving

1.Chopped potato, cauliflower, carrot & green peas into a 2-3 liter capacity pressure cooker. Add 1/2 cup water & salt to taste.

2.Close the pressure cooker with a lid & cook over medium flame for 2-whistles. Turn off the flame. Open the lid after pressure releases naturally; it will take around 5-7 minutes.

3.Mash the boiled vegetables gently with potato masher or using the backside of a large spoon until little chunky texture. You can mash cooked veggies into a texture you like – with small chunks or smooth with no chunks at all. The texture of your bhaji would depend on how you mashed the veggies.

4.Heat 2-tablespoons oil & 2-tablespoons butter together in a pan over medium flame. Add chopped onion & ginger-garlic paste. Sauté until onion turns translucent. 

5.Add chopped capsicum, chopped tomato & salt. Sauté until tomatoes & capsicum turn soft.

6.Add 1½ teaspoons red chilli powder, 1/4 teaspoon turmeric powder, 1-teaspoon cumin-coriander powder & 1-teaspoon readymade pav bhaji masala powder. Stir & cook for a minute.

7.Add 3/4 cup water, mix well & cook for 2-3 minutes. Add boiled & mashed vegetables & 1-teaspoon lemon juice.

8.Mix well and cook for 4-5 minutes. Taste for the salt at this stage & add more if required. Turn off the flame. Add chopped coriander leaves & mix well. Bhaji is ready for serving.

9.Cut the pav buns horizontally into halves. Heat grill over medium flame. Add a tablespoon of butter & place halved pav buns over it. Grill both sides until light brown spots appear, it will take around 30 seconds for each side to turn light brown. Transfer to the plate. Grill remaining pavs.

10.Transfer prepared bhaji to a serving bowl & garnish with a cube of butter. Serve hot with butter Grilled pav, sliced onion & lemon wedges.

I thank Parsi Cuisine to give me this platform to share my Recipes & my Pics & Posts related to Food.

Let’s Share our recipes & have a learning growth to our favorite connection food. You can find Erik Treasuryvala on facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/etreasuryvala/

 

Bon Appetite

#ParsiCuisine #FridayFiesta

Click here to Enter Contest.

Fiesta Friday #258  Your solo co-host this week is Laurena @ Life Diet Health

@etreasuryvala
#pavbhaji , #butterpao ,#paobhaji #loveforfood#food#foodbeast#tryitordiet#foodmaniacindia#eatorpass#mumbaifoodblogger#mumbaifoodexplorer#exploringplates#foodiedilse#indianfoodiye#thecutsteve#cookingdiary#designedbite#yummyfoods#chompeatery

Health benefits of Ganthoda powder in Parsi Vasanu

Health benefits of Ganthoda powder and Vasanu

GANTHODA
Ganthoda is a powder made from the root of a long pepper. This powder is known by several other names, which include pipramul and peepramul; however, ganthoda is a word native to India.

Ganthoda powder mixed with ginger powder, water and jaggery is an Indian natural remedy for gastric discomfort and joint pain, according to Spices Online.

Ganthoda powder is used in many Indian recipes and in tea as an ayurvedic treatment.

The Parsi Vasanu (click for recipe) includes Gandhoda powder. Vasanu is eaten in cold winter weather early in the morning for maximum benefits.

COMBINED USES
Individuals who want to increase their magnesium intake to prevent bone problems may find the most benefit in drinking milk or consuming milk-based dairy products. This is because some milk-based dairy contains both calcium and magnesium, which work together in this respect. This may not be ideal for a person with lactose intolerance or irritable bowel syndrome, as milk can trigger a variety of gastrointestinal symptoms. Some people add ganthoda powder to milk to ease these discomforts, although there are no studies to prove its effectiveness.

CONSIDERATIONS
Although magnesium is FDA-approved for use, ganthoda is not. Neither magnesium nor ganthoda are FDA-approved to cure illnesses, so before using them to treat or prevent any illness, speak to your physician. Magnesium is an important mineral to consume and although it is possible to consume enough through diet, your physician may suggest that you take a supplement to meet your needs. Ganthoda has no known contra indications or side effects, but since no studies are published on its effectiveness, speak to your physician before consuming large quantities of it.

Besan Ladoo

One of the most popular and favorite sweets that are made during the Diwali festivities are “Besan Ladoo”.

These ladoos are offered to the gods as offerings, distributed to family and friends and enjoyed as a blessing.

This same ladoo is used in a ceremony for besna – besan ladoos are kept. For paglaru ceremony khaman na larva.

Besan Ladoo

Recipe

Ingredients

  • 1 cup besan (chickpea flour)

  • 1 cup granulated white sugar, powdered

  • ¼  teaspoon cardamom powder

  • ⅓ cup + 2 tbsp. ghee (clarified butter)

  • 5 tsps of Raisins, Crushed Pistachio nuts or Almonds (Optional)

Method

  1. Put 1/3 cup of ghee in a pan and add besan to it.

  2. Roast the besan on low-medium flame for 10-12 minutes till it starts giving a sweet aroma. The color of the besan will also change to light golden brown.

  3. Once the besan is roasted, switch off the flame and allow is cool down a bit, around 5-7 minutes.

  4. In the meanwhile, using a blend powder the sugar with cardamom powder. Set aside.

  5. After 5-7 minutes, the besan would cool down a bit, remember you still want it to be warm but it shouldn’t be hot.

  6. Once it’s warm and you can hold the besan mixture in your hands, add the sugar and 2 tbsp of melted ghee into it and mix.

  7. Take a small amount of the mixture in your palm and press with your fingers to make a small round ball.

  8. Use the entire mixture to form ladoos while the mixture is still warm.

  9. Using your thumb, make an indentation in ladoo while warm and press one Raisin or Crushed Pistachio nuts or Almonds mix. (Optional)

These besan ladoos will stay for 15 days unless they are gone in the first day, like in my home 🙂

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Now, let’s party! Join Fiesta Friday #249 by adding your link. Don’t forget to link your post to FiestaFriday.net and the co-hosts’ blogs, so we can feature you. Your co-hosts this week areDiann @ Of Goats and Greens and Jenny @ Apply To Face Blog.

 

Milk Pudding

Milk Pudding

Serves 4

Ingredients

6 cups milk

1/4 cup raw Rice

1 cup sugar

Few pistachios, almonds and saffron strands for garnish

1 tsp cardamom powder

Method
1. Process the raw rice in any food chopper till it is broken up in small bits.

2. Boil the rice, milk and sugar till creamy consistency.

3. Add in the cardamom and let it cool.

4. Sprinkle with chopped pistachios, chopped almonds and saffron strands and refrigerate.

When you are ready to serve, pour milk pudding into a decorative dessert dish. I used my icecream dessert cup, makes a good effect when you hand your guests the dessert.

This Indian dessert is a favorite at Diwali time or in any party. It is called DOODH PAK in Indian gujarati. Doodh is the  word for milk, and pak is term for a sweet dessert.

Instant Pot: Ayurvedic Detox with Khichri

Khichri is a free-form dish, allowing for many variations. Although any type of lentil can be used like Mung, Tuver, or Masoor, the most common parsi version uses Tuver dal.

White Basmati rice is used since it is easy to digest but brown rice can also be used for more fiber and minerals in your diet. The spices are variable depending on your taste and liking. So is the ratio of lentils to rice. The consistency can be runny or dry as desired, however make sure the dal and rice are thoroughly cooked and soft.

The lentils and ghee are now a days available in Whole Foods, Amazon or local Indian Grocery Stores like Patel Brothers, Apna Bazar, etc

Khichri  is the Ayurvedic  detox food.  Khichadi, pronounced kich-ah-ree and sometimes spelled “kitchari” or “khichdi,” has long been used to nourish babies and the elderly, the sick and the healthy during special times of Detox and Diet Cleansing.

This khichri was made in a Instant Pot. It came out moist, soft and took less time to make!

Recipe

Photo: Ayurvedic Detox with Khichri
Photo: Ayurvedic Detox with Khichri

1/2 cup rice white or brown basmati or jasmine rice
1/2 cup  Mung Dal (split) or Tuver Dal
2 cups water
1 tsp turmeric

1 tsp salt
2 tbsps oil or Ghee

Tempering

2-3 tbsp clarified butter (ghee)

1/2 chopped medium Onion

1 tsp cumin seeds (jeera)

Method

Wash and clean the rice and dal and soak in water for 15 minutes.

In a Instant Pot and press “Brown” button.
To temper: Finely slice the onion and fry in oil till golden brown. Add cumin seeds and count to 3.
Add dal, water, salt and turmeric and bring to rolling boil on high heat. This is crucial to khichri coming out well done.
Add rice and bring to boil again.
Cover instant pot and set timer to 9 minutes.
Cook for 9 minutes covered and then keep instant pot on warm till you serve.

This rice dish goes well with kids, give with a little sugar added to 1 year old.

Cleanse Regimen:

A khichri cleanse consists of eating khichri for breakfast, lunch and dinner for 3 consecutive days. The theory behind this regimen is to give the digestive tract (intestines) a chance to rest, regulate and heal itself.

Khichri has the primary and essential nutrients for the body, while being gentle on the digestive system. After the cleanse, stagnation in the cleanser’s digestion and metabolism is alleviated , allowing him/her to resume a normal healthy lifestyle and diet.

  1. Drink one cup of hot water with lemon upon wakening.

  2. Allow 30 minutes before eating breakfast.

  3. Do yoga in this time or walk.

  4. For breakfast eat 1 cup of cooked khichri.

  5. For lunch and dinner eat khichri until full, avoid overeating.

  6. For snack eat vegetable and fruits.

  7. Repeat for 3 consecutive days.

Bombay Duck (Boomla) Cutlets

Taja Boomla Cutlets from Vividh Vani. Only change in the recipe is that I’ve barely used any oil while frying.

TAJA BOOMLA CUTLETS

by Kainaaz R. Patell

6 big boomlas or 12 medium sized
2 cups Kothmir Cilantro washed and chopped fine
3 Big green chillies

1 tsp Ground pepper
4 eggs
Bread crumbs or ravo as per requirement
Rice flour and ghee as per requirement

Grind chopped kothmir and chillies or cut very finely. Break 1 egg in a plate and beat it well.

Clean and wash the boomlas. Cut each open on ONE side only and carve out the kanta from the middle with a sharp knife. Cut each boomla into 3 pieces if big, or 2 pieces if medium sized. Mix 2 tsp salt into them and arrange them in a big sieve. Put a fitting lid over them so as to squeeze/ press them tight. Keep for 15 minutes. Then apply rice flour and wash them well.

Add kothmir, chillies and pepper paste and the beaten egg and mix well. Roll each boomla in ravo or bread crumbs, press well and roll again 2 times.

Break the remaining 3 eggs in a big plate, beat them to a fine mix. 1 pinch of salt for each egg. Place each boomla carefully in the mixture. Using hand or use the spatula. Turn carefully on the other side with spatula, or pour egg mixture on the upper side with a spoon to cover the boomla well.

Heat oil and when properly heated, place each boomla carefully with a spatula. Cook on a slow fire. When 1 side is done, turn it over and fry the other side.

How to make Dhansak masala at home

Dhansak Masala Powder

Ingredients:

1 Kg. Coriander seeds (Dhanya seeds)

200 grms Cumin (Jeera Seeds)

100 grms Black Pepper (Kali Mirchi)

100 grms Fenugreek seeds (Methi seeds) (Omit if you are allergic to fenugreek)

100 grms Black Mustard seeds (Rai)

300 grms Red Chilies

200 grms Haldi (Turmeric powder)

50 grms Tej Patta (Tamal Patta)

20 grms Badyan (Black Flower shaped anise pods)

20 grms Lavang (Cloves)

20 grms Dalchini (Cinnamon sticks)

20 grms Dry Soonth (Ginger powder)

20 grms Elaichi (Cardamom powder)

Method:

  1. Check and clean all ingredients for debris and keep in sunlight for 1 day.
  2. Roast on Tava taking care to prevent scorching.
  3. Cool. Then grind into a powder in a Ninja Machine or Masala chakki.
  4. Let the Masala cool. Sieve and fill in airtight containers.

 

Baingan (Eggplant) Bharta with Curd (Yogurt)

Ingredients
2 medium Brinjals (Eggplant)
1 onion
150 gms curd (yogurt)
2-3 chillies
100 gms peanuts
Sprinkle of coriander
Salt to taste

Method
1) Roast brinjal over fire.
2) Make paste
3) In a pot add the brinjal paste, crushed peanuts, curds, chillies, cut onion, coriander and salt.
4) Mix it together and serve.

13. Remove and place in serving bowl. Sprinkle fresh coriander if you like.

Kaanda Keri ma gos

13. Remove and place in serving bowl. Sprinkle fresh coriander if you like.
13. Remove and place in serving bowl. Sprinkle fresh coriander if you like.

Delicious Mutton with small onions called “Doongri” in India. In summer (June – July), they are sold in the indian market. In fact there is a town called “Doongri” that I visited with my parents. These photos were sent from Surat, India. Thanks Hoshang Gandhi.

Mangoes, Small whole Onions and Vinegar with Meat make a delicious combination when cooked together.

TIP: In N America – Look for small onions in Whole Foods Market. The doongri taste is different.

Ingredients:

Small Onions (kaandi)
Small Onions (kaandi)
 Pieces of small mangoes
Pieces of small mangoes
Green Chillies
Green Chillies
Boil the Mutton Pieces
Boil the Mutton Pieces
Tejanu - black large cardmom is better than the small white ones
Tejanu – black large cardmom is better than the small white ones
1. Heat Ghee in Pot
Heat Ghee in Pot
2. Add the Tejanu
Add the Tejanu
3. Fry for 2 minutes on low heat
Fry for 2 minutes on low heat
4. Add Cumin Seeds
Add Cumin Seeds
5. Add Onions and Green Chillies
Add Onions and Green Chillies
6. Fry till light brown from outside
Fry till light brown from outside
7. Add Ginger Garlic pastes, Turmeric, Red Chilli Powder, Coriander Powder (Dhaanna), Cumin powder, and a pinch of Garam Masala.
Add Ginger Garlic pastes, Turmeric, Red Chilli Powder, Coriander Powder (Dhaanna), Cumin powder, and a pinch of Garam Masala.
8. Fry all masalas for 3 - 4 minutes
Fry all masalas for 3 – 4 minutes
9. Add boiled mutton pieces
Add boiled mutton pieces

12. Mix and cook with lid on for 15 minutes on low heat. Cook till mango shrinks and softens more. Add Jaggery (gor) and Vinegar (Kolah) for Sweet and Sour taste. Khatta Mitha Taste!
Mix and cook with lid on for 15 minutes on low heat. Cook till mango shrinks and softens more. Add Jaggery (gor) and Vinegar (Kolah) for Sweet and Sour taste. Khatta Mitha Taste!
11. Add the Mango pieces and salt
Add the Mango pieces and salt

Add Mutton pieces

10. Fry till aroma comes out !
Fry till aroma comes out !
13. Remove and place in serving bowl. Sprinkle fresh coriander if you like.
Remove and place in serving bowl. Sprinkle fresh coriander if you like.

Omelette

Make a mix of:

4 eggs beaten

1 tsp Ginger and Garlic Paste

1/2 tsp Turmeric

1/2 Red Chilly Powder

In a non-stick pan heat 3 tsp of canola oil and pour in the mixture.

Cover. Cook on very slow heat till done.

Serve immediately.

Chutney and Salmon with a new twist

Ingredients

  • 6 – 8 Salmon Fillets
  • 2 tsp Red Chilli powder
  • 2 tsp turmeric
  • 1 tsp Salt
  • Olive Oil as needed
  • Baking Dish
  • Prepared Creamy Coconut Chutney

Method – Assemble the Baked Salmon Dish:

  1. Spread Olive oil in a baking dish.
  2. Mix turmeric, red pepper and salt over 4 salmon fillets.
  3. Spread a thick layer of chutney in the baking dish.
  4. Place the salmon fillets on this chutney.
  5. Drizzle olive oil over the salmon fillets.
  6. Spread more chutney on top.
  7. Bake on 350 degress F for 25 minutes or until done.
  8. Layer the prepared chutney with marinated salmon

This chutney may be used on Patra ni Maachi, Salmon Baked Fish, Sandwiches, Potato Pattice and as a condiment.

Creamy Coconut Chutney
Creamy Coconut Chutney

Mutton Pulao

Prep Time: 30 minutes
Cooking Time:30 minutes
Yield: Serves 6
Ingredients:

  • 3 lbs Chicken, Lamb, Goat meat or Mutton
  • 1 teaspoon ginger paste
  • 1 teaspoon garlic paste
  • 1/2 teaspoon red chili powder (cayenne pepper)
  • 1 teaspoon dhana-jeera powder (coriander-cumin)
  • 1/2 teaspoon black pepper
  • 1/2 cup milk
  • 2 generous pinches of saffron
  • 1/3 cup raisins
  • 1/4 cup oil
  • 1 cinnamon stick
  • 5 green cardamom pods
  • 3 cloves
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 3 sliced onions
  • 1 thinly sliced long green chile pepper (6″)
  • 5 teaspoon sugar
  • 2 1/2 teaspoons salt
  • 2 cups Basmati rice

Method

  1. Cut meat into bite size pieces.
  2. Toss with ginger paste, garlic paste, chili powder, dhana-jeera powder and black pepper. Leave to marinate for 15 minutes.
  3. Heat milk. Add saffron and let stand for 15 minutes.
  4. Place raisins in a bowl and cover with boiling water for 15 minutes. Drain and set aside.
  5. In a large pot, heat oil. Add whole spices and fry for 1 minute.
  6. Add onion and chilies and fry for 10 minutes, stirring often, until caramelized. Remove onions and spices from pot.
  7. Add meat and fry until browned.
  8. Return the onion and spices to the pot. Keep a little of the caramelized onion for garnish
  9. Add raisins, sugar, salt, saffron milk, rice and 3 cups water. Bring to a boil.
  10. Reduce to a simmer, cover and cook for 15 minutes.
  11. Fluff with a fork and serve, garnished with caramelized onions.
  Serve mutton pulao with vegetarian dhansak masala dar. Spicy lentil Dhansak is a puree made to go with rice pilaf. Sample recipe from my Meats Parsi Cuisine Cookbook shown below.
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Rita’s Secret Cashew Lamb Curry revealed!

Rita’s Secret “Kaju Mutton ” Cashew Lamb Curry revealed !

Lamb can be substituted with Mutton.

Kaju is a Indian word for Cashew. (Cashews can be substituted with Almonds)

Cashew Lamb Dish

Ingredients

  • 4 lbs boneless Lamb

Marinate lamb

  • 10 tsp. Ginger Garlic paste

  • 3 tsp Salt

  • 1 tsp turmeric powder

Fry in hot oil

  • 2 medium onions grated

  • 2 tomatoes chopped

  • 1” 5 pieces of cinnamon

  • 9 cloves

  • 7 cardamom pods cracked open a little

  • 9 Black peppercorns

  • Oil as required

Grind to paste

  • 1 cup Cashew nuts

  • 1 cup Yogurt

Dry Spices 

  • 1 tsp Garam Masala

  • 4 tsp red curry powder

  • 1 tsp salt

  • 1 tsp Dhanna Jeera powder

  • 1 tsp cumin

  • 1 tsp turmeric powder

  • 1 tsp red chilli powder

  • 1/2 tsp saffron (optional)Add to taste: Salt and  about 1 cup thick cream at the very end.

Method 

  1. In a pan heat 3 tblsp oil and sauté onion till translucent.

  2. Add the cinnamon sticks, cardamon and cloves.

  3. Stir well and brown the onion.

  4. Grind Cashews and Yogurt into a paste

  5. Saute Lamb pieces for 15 minutes on medium heat.

  6. Add the dry spices now with the yogurt and nut paste, marinated lamb and saute 10 more minutes. Add more oil if needed.

  7. Give it a good stir and add the saffron, enough water to get a good gravy and close the pressure cooker lid.

  8. Bring the pressure cooker to the first whistle on medium heat  and then and let it cook on the lowest flame till the lamb is cooked to desired tenderness. (15 – 20 minutes).

  9. Remove Lamb curry and add the cream.

  10. Sprinkle with potato matchsticks (sali) and serve.

 Tip: For added flavor you should roast and soak saffron in little hot milk.

Serve with hot  Basmati rice or Naan or Roti.

Best wishes for a very Happy Navroze for you and your family,

Seven recipes to celebrate Parsi New Year 2017

Satisfy your Parsi Food cravings. We hope you will cook delicious, mouth-watering food with the recipes, cookbooks and videos provided on this site.

Get $5 off our books for the coming Parsi New Year Celebrations. 

Apply Discount Code “AFDX5BD5” * Sale ends August 31, 2017 Click on image to go to the Amazon Create Space shopping cart. Next, add the book you want and then apply discount code. Proceed to check out.

Commemorated in a grand and elaborate fashion, preparations for  Navroze begin well in advance. Houses are cleaned to remove all the cobwebs and painted new. They are then adorned with different auspicious symbols, namely, stars, butterflies, birds and fish. New attires are ordered and made especially for the festival. On the day of  Navroze, people dress in their new and best clothes and put on gold and silver kustis and caps. The doors and windows are beautified with garlands of roses and jasmines. Color powders are used for creating beautiful and attractive patterns, known as rangoli, on the steps and thresholds. These intricate and creative patterns display the sanctity of the festivals. Moreover, fish and floral motifs are a favorite among rangolis and considered highly auspicious.

Guests are welcomed by sprinkling rose water and rice, followed by applying a tilak. Breakfast usually consists of Sev (a vermicelli preparation roasted in ghee and choc-a-bloc with dry fruits) which is served with yogurt and enjoyed by young and old alike. After breakfast, it is time to visit the Agiary or Fire Temple to offer prayers. Special thanksgiving prayers, known as Jashan, are held and sandalwood is offered to the Holy Fire. At the end of this religious ceremony, all Parsis take the privilege to exchange new greetings with one another by saying ‘Sal Mubarak’. Back home, special delicacies are made marking the lunch as an elaborate and delicious affair.

Various Parsi dishes, such as Sali boti (a mutton and potato preparation), chicken farchas, patrani machchi (fish steamed in a leaf), mutton pulao and dal, kid gosh and saas ni machchi (a thick white gravy with pomfret) jostle for space on the table. However, the most significant dish that forms an integral part of Jamshed Navroz celebrations is pulav (rice enriched with nuts and saffron, aka biryani). Besides, plain rice and moong dal are a must on this day. Desserts too are not behind in terms of variety, the most important being falooda. It is a sweet milk drink made from vermicelli and flavored with rose essence. Lagan-nu-custard, or caramel custard, is another favorite on this occasion. The entire day is spent by visiting friends and relative and exchanging good wishes and blessings.

Suggested Menu for the Navroz day:

sev 002

Breakfast 

 Parsi Sev Sweet Vermicelli (shown above)

 Parsi Ravo (Sweet cream of wheat)

BREAKFAST: Akuri
BREAKFAST: Akuri

Akuri

Lunch

Khari Maachi (served with Mora Dal Chawal / Parsi Dhan Dal ) Recipe 1

 Dhan Dal (Steamed Rice with plain dal) with Khari Fish

Fried Fish
Fried Fish

Tareli Maachi

 

Dinner

Chicken with Apricots / Jardalu ma Marghi
Chicken with Apricots / Jardalu ma Marghi

 Chicken with Apricots / Jardalu ma Marghi

Dessert

DESSERT: Lagan nu Custard - garnished with almonds, pistachios
DESSERT: Lagan nu Custard – garnished with almonds, pistachios

 Lagan nu Custard

Batasa – a favorite biscuit snack. Good with Tea or Coffee anytime! 

Batasa

 

Silver Pomfret Fry

IMG_3143 - Copy

Pampus argenteus/ silver or white pomfret is a species of butterfish that lives in coastal waters off the Middle East, South Asia, and Southeast Asia. This fish is prized in the Indo-Asia-Pacific region; has subtle flavour and has high Omega 3 and Vitamin content, its flesh is soft and buttery when cooked.

What’s the Best Vegan Omega-3 Supplement?
Healthy Plant-Based Living? View Site

Recipe of Silver Pomfret Fry

8 small pomfret fish  (Butter-fish can be substituted)

Marinate the fish in:

  • ¼ tsp. of turmeric powder,

  • ½ tsp. (or according to preference of taste) of kashmiri chilli powder,

  • ½ tsp. (or according to preference of taste) of garam masala,

  • Salt – according to preference of flavour,

  • Mashed pieces of 6 to 8 garlic cloves,

  • 2 tsp. of chilli vinegar (- this vinegar is not pungent in flavour, has a flavourful   pungent aroma)

  • Coat the marinated fish along with the mashed pieces of garlic in rice flour before shallow frying the fish in any mild-flavour vegetable oil,  fry the fish in low heat for about 5 minutes.

Cucumber Pickle made fresh from Summer Cucumbers

Made fresh from Summer Cucumbers, which are a plenty here in USA 🙂

With 5 large ones and the heat of the summer, I knew these cukes would go bad soon. After 5 minutes of wondering what to do with the whole batch, I thought of making a pickle/pani nu achar with the cucumbers. Guess what it was delicious. My hubby and son gobbled it up so fast, next thing I know Jim brings more cucumbers and asks for the same pickle to be made again.

Serve pickle as a condiment, use in Sandwiches.

Ingredients

  • 5 large cucumbers peeled and sliced
  • 1 cup White Vinegar
  • 1 cup Apple Cider Vinegar
  • 1 tsp Red Chili powder
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1 tsp Turmeric powder
  • 1/2 tsp Asafoetida powder (Hing)
  • 1 tsp Fenugreek powder
  • 1 large airtight jar

Method

  1. Put the cucumber slices in the airtight jar. Make sure the jar is bone dry.
  2. Mix all the spices into the vinegar and pour over the cucumbers.
  3. Let pickle marinate for 5 days if you can. (Mine got gobbled up in the first week)

Get Cookbook: Pickles, Preserves and Chutneys by Rita Kapadia  

* Dill can be Substituted

A traditional and very easy Mango Pickle (Pani nu Achaar) is made with raw green mangoes and this recipe can be used with raw green mangoes.

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Masala Chai ( Spiced Tea)

A cup of tea shared with another person is known to create a new karma each time. So next time you have a cup of tea with someone, have good thoughts, and share good words.

 

Health value: Antioxidant

Removes Headaches, Muscle aches, soothes and relaxes.

Ingredients:

2 cups water

4 tea bags, black tea

2 cups milk, or lowfat milk

4 slices fresh ginger root, about 1 inch thick

1-1/2 Tbsps. honey

1/2 tsp. ground nutmeg

1/2 tsp. ground cardamom

1/4 tsp. ground allspice

1/4 tsp. ground cinnamon

1/8 tsp. sugar (optional)

Instructions:

Bring water to a boil in a saucepan. Add tea bags, reduce heat, and simmer for 3-4 minutes. Remove tea bags, add remaining ingredients, and bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer for 5-7 minutes. Strain and serve. Serves 4 cups.

 

Cookbook: Tea of India

 

The Lazy Gastronome

Shrimp Patio

Prawn Patio

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ingredients

3 Onions finely chopped
2 lbs Prawns or Shrimp
3 Green chilles finely chopped
2 tsp Garlic finely minced
1 bunch Kotmir ( coriander leaves)
1 tsp Haldi ( tumeric) powder
1 tsp red chilli powder
1 tsp Cumin seeds
1 tsp dhanya powder
2 inch piece of Jaggery
5 Tomatoes finely chopped
1 tsp Salt 

Method
1. Marinate the prawns with salt and haldi. Keep it aside.

  1. Now in a pan add oil when hot add  jeera seeds. Bring to a crackle and  add onions,  garlic and fry till little brown.
  2. Now add jaggery and green chillies. when the jaggery melts add tomatoes.
  3. Suate and make it all soft, then add red chili powder, haldi, dhanya and  salt.. When the masala is cooked well add the prawns
  4. If you wish, add water but its not needed.
  5. When prawns are cooked garnish with coriander leaves.

Shrimp Patio is ready.

Serve with Dhan dar.

Purchase our Cookbook on Seafoods

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80 Biryanis around the world

Best Biriyani Around the world and its Origin
Biryani was originated in Iran (Persia) and it was brought to South Asia by Iranian travelers and merchants. Local variants of this dish are popular not only in South Asia but also in Arabia and within various South Asian communities in Western countries.

The spices and condiments used in biryani may include, but are not limited to, ghee, nutmeg, mace, min, pepper, cloves, cardamom, cinnamon, bay leaves, coriander, mint leaves, ginger, onions, and garlic. The premium varieties include saffron. For a non-vegetarian biryani, the main ingredient that accompanies the spices is themeat—beef, chicken, goat, lamb, fish or shrimp. The dish may be served with dahi chutney or Raita, korma, curry, a sour dish of eggplant (brinjal) , boiled egg and salad.

The difference between biryani and pullao is that while pullao may be made by cooking the items together, biryani is used to denote a dish where the rice (plain or fried) is cooked separately from the thick sauce (curry of meat or vegetables). The curry and the rice are then brought together and layered, resulting in a dish of the contrasting flavors of flavored rice (which is cooked separate with spices) and intensely flavored sauce and meat or vegetables.

What differentiates a Biryani from a Pilaf is that in a Biryani, the rice and meat with vegetables are cooked in layers whereas in a Pulao, the rice is mixed with the meat and vegetables and cooked together. Pilaf appears to be native to India, whereas Biryani is the Mughal influence in the Indian Subcontinent.

Hyderabadi Biryani

Non-vegetarian Hyderabadi biryani is savored in all parts of India and forms an integral part of Indian cuisine. The Nizam’s kitchen boasted of 49 kinds, which included biryani made from fish, quail, shrimp, deer and hare. The most famous of all, Hyderabadi Biryani is called the “Kacchi Yeqni” Biryani as both the marinated meat and the rice are cooked together.

Non-vegetarian Bhatkali biryani is a special biryany savored in all parts of coastal Karnataka and forms an integral part of Navayathcuisine. The Bhatkal’s biryani evolved from the Bombay biryani which was further refinedto give a distinct color taste and flavour. Bhatkali biryani can be of various kind, which include biryani made from either mutton, fish, chicken, beef, or shrimp. The biriyani is quite different from others across India in that the onions are used in larger proportions compared to other regions. The dish is cooked with the meat and onion based sauce being at the bottom of the cooking pot with a thick layer of rice on top, the rice and meat are mixed before serving. Local spices such as cardamom, cloves and cinnamon are used to get the distinct aroma.
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Kacchi Biryani

Kacchi Biryani is a special preparation of the dish. It is called ‘Kacchi’ because this style originated in the Kutch region of the Subcontinent.[Kacchi Biryani is same as Kacchi Yeqni” means raw marinated meat cooked with rice] It is cooked typically withgoat meat (usually ‘khasi gosht’, which is meat from castrated goats and often simply referred to as mutton) or with lamb, beef and rarely with chicken. The dish is cooked layered with the meat and the yoghurt based marinade at the bottom of the cooking pot and the layer of rice (usually basmati rice) placed over it. Potatoes are often added before adding the rice layer. The pot is usually sealed (typically with wheat dough) to allow cooking in its own steam and not opened till ready to serve. The challenge in the art of cooking kacchi biryani is to cook the meat till tender without overcooking the rice. When serving up the dish the chef takes a bit of rice from the top layer and meat from the bottom layer and deftly serves it up together. A boiled egg and mixed salad often accompanies the dish. This is one of the most popular delicacies of old Dhaka, Bangladesh and Hyderabad, India. It is featured in wedding feasts in Bangladesh and is usually served with borhani, a spicy drink.

Lucknowi (Awadhi) Biryani

Lucknow and biryani have an almost symbiotic relationship. The Lucknow (Awadhi) biryani is the footprint that the Muslims of theMughal Empire left on the northern part of India. It originated in the village ‘Bare Next’ and although it originated in the North, Virani Biryani has also picked up flavors of the South. The Awadhi Biryani is also known as “Pukka” Biryani as the rice and meat are cooked separately and then layered. Its taste is diffrent from the other places. It cooked into the big patilas of Tamba.In the last time of cooking they put some ashes on the lid of patila/Degh to all round cooking.

Moradabadi Biryani

This type of biryani is only found in the Moradabad city of the state of Uttar Pradesh in India. It is also known as Moradabadi Yakhni Biryani. This is so because, it is prepared with pre cooked meat boiled with spices(masalas and khushboos), which is known as Yakhni(meat stock). A slightly different version of this biryani is also found in Delhi, which is made up of slightly different spices and a different variety of rice. A special thing about this biryani is that it is flavoured with nutmeg, mace and Butter chillies(locally known as “pili Mirch”), which are not widely used in the Delhi version of the Moradabadi Biryani, and this makes it different.

Calcutta Biryani

The third in the list of famous Biriyanis, Calcutta or Kolkata biryani evolved from the Lucknow style when Wajid Ali Shah, the lastnawab of Awadh was exiled in 1856 to the Kolkata suburb of Metiaburj.[3] But he did not forget bringing his personal Chef with him as he was very particular about his food. Due to recession Aloo (Potato) had been used instead of meat. Later on that has been an iconic difference in Calcutta Biryani, though meat is also served along with it. In addition, Calcutta biriyani is much lighter on spices (Masala) than compared to other Biryani’s.

Sindhi Biryani

The Sindhi biryani variant of Biryani is very popular in Pakistani cuisine and Biryani of all types are eaten in all parts of Pakistan and the world. In Pakistan Biryani enjoys substantial popularity, particularly in the cities of Karachi and Hyderabad, where the chicken version is popular. Most Biryani cuisines in Pakistan combine elements of Sindhi Biryani such as the common use of Yogurtrecipes. The national flag carrier, PIA, also serves this cuisine for most of its western bound flights to give foreigners a feel of Pakistani cuisines.

There is also another meat free version prepared in the Punjab and northern areas of Pakistan that has proved quite popular and to meet the dietary requirements. The dish offers the usual local vegetables as well as a sour yogurt to cool off the stomach from the spices.

Memoni Biryani

Memoni biryani was developed by the Memon ethnic group and is very similar to Sindhi Biryani. It has variations though, among families, as do most biryanis, though the Bantva Memons community most commonly makes biryani in this form. Memoni biryani is made with lamb, yogurt, fried onions, and potatoes, and less tomatoes compared to Sindhi biryani. Memoni biryani also uses less food coloring compared to other biryanis, allowing the rich colors of the various meats, rice, and vegetables to blend without too much of the orange coloring. Memoni biryani is especially notable in Karachi, Pakistan.

Tahari

Tahari, Tehri or Tehari is the name given to the vegetarian version of Biryani and is very popular in Pakistani and Indian homes. In Bangladesh, Tehari refers to Biryani prepared by adding the meat (usually beef) to the rice as opposed to the case of traditional Biryani, where the rice is added to the meat. In Kashmir tahari is served out-doors on roads and streets. This is done so that a traveler, who may be hungry, can eat this to satisfy his hunger.
The Kozhikode Biriyani variant of biryani is very popular in Kerala cuisine introduced by Muslims. This preparation is popular across the coast of Kerala—the Malabar region particularly. The biriyani may contain beef, chicken, mutton or fish as the main ingredient. The biriyani is quite different from others across India in that the rice used is generally mixed with ghee to produce a very rich flavour. Although local spices such as nutmeg, cashew, cloves and cinnamon are used, there is only a small amount of chilli (or chilli powder) used in the preparation making the dish much less spicy in comparison to other biriyanis from across India. It is also known as Malabar biriyani, which is the made all along the Malabar area in Kerala from Kozhikkodu (Calicut) to Kasargod, with minor or no taste variation.

Danbauk

In Myanmar, biryani, known in Burmese as danpauk/danbauk or danpauk htamin , is popular. Popular ingredients are cashew nuts, yogurt, raisins and peas, chicken, cloves, cinnamon, saffron and bayleaf. In Burmese biryani, the chicken is cooked with the rice.Biryani is also eaten with a salad of sliced onions and cucumber. In Yangon, there are several restaurant chains that serve biryani exclusively. It is often served at religious ceremonies and luncheons. Biryani in Myanmar utilizes a special rice grown domestically rather than basmati.

Thai Biryani

In Thailand, Thai Muslims have popularized a local variety of the dish, known as Khao mok, which is popular throughout the country. Chicken and beef are the most common form but there is also a goat version that is eaten almost exclusively by the Muslim population. Along with Thai Massaman curry (Musulman Curry) and satay it is one of the most notable Muslim Thai dishes. Biryani is also another name for heena.

Sri Lankan Biryani

In Sri Lanka Biryani is most popular amongst Muslims and is usually served with chicken, beef or mutton. In many cases, Sri Lankan biryani is much spicier than most Indian varieties. Popular side dishes include Acchar, Malay Pickle, cashew curry and Ground Mint Sambol.

A popular form of biryani uses string hoppers as a substitute for rice. It is often served with scrambled eggs or vegetables.

Dam Pokht/Dam-pokhtak

During the Safavid dynasty, a dish called “Berian Polo” was made with lamb or chicken, marinated overnight – with yogurt, herbs, spices, dried fruits like raisins, prunes or pomegranate seeds – and later cooked in a tannour oven. It was then served with steamed rice.

In its more original form, in some cities the dish is known as “Dam Pokht/Dam-pokhtak“. The compound in Persian means “steam-cooked”—a reference to the steamed rice that forms the basis of the dish. This name is still in common use in Iran alongside “beriani“. In Southeast Asian countries such as Burma/Myanmar, this older, general Persian term is in common use, as ‘danpauk‘.

In the central Iranian city of Isfahan, Berian is made with cooked mutton or lamb, which is stewed and minced separately, and then grilled in special small round shallow pans in an oven or over a fire. The meat is generally served with powdered cinnamon in a local bread, usually “noun-e taftoun”, but also occasionally “noun-e sangak”.

Iraqi Biryani

Al Biryani is one of many famous dishes from the traditional Iraqi kitchen. It is widespread in Iraq as well as many other middle eastern countries. It is also very popular and considered a staple cuisine throughout the Kurdish territories. Different variations of biryani can be found in the different regions of Iraq. It is believed that the cooking style of “Dum” or “cooking in steam” style of cooking has its origins in Arabia.Typically with Iraqi biryani the rice is usually saffron based with either lamb or chicken being the meat or poultry of choice. Iraqi biryani is usually quite mild in terms of its spicyness when compared to its south-east Asian variants. Some variations include vermicelli or mixed nuts and raisins spread liberally over the rice.
Malaysia’s Nasi Beriani
In Malaysia and Singapore, the dish is called Nasi Beriani or Nasi Beryani or Nasi Briani or Nasi Minyak. It is commonly served with Rendang dish and Sirap Bandungbeverage especially during wedding receptions of Muslim Malays community. Nasi Beriani Gam, a special version of the dish is famous and favourite in the southernMalaysian state of Johor, especially in Muar and Batu Pahat.

Singapore

In Singapore, the dish is called Nasi Briyani by the Malays or simply Briyani by the Indians (note the different spelling and pronunciation: “briyani” as opposed to “biryani”). It is a very popular dish amongst the local population, especially Singaporean Indians and Malays, being a choice serving at weddings of both these communities. There are also speciality restaurants, commonly in Little India and Arab Street, and also regular Indian Muslim food stalls in coffee-shops all over the island that serve several types of briyani; distinctly Indian or Malay. The very common types come in either the chicken, mutton or fish versions, always accompanied with Achar (a pickled combination of cucumbers, onions, red chillies and pineapples) or Raita and a hard-boiled egg (in South Indian versions only). There are also Afghan, Iranian and Turkish manifestations of this dish available in some restaurants.

Filipino Dish

There’s a version of Biryani in the Philippine’s Pampanga region on the northern island of Luzon and in the predominantly Muslim areas of the southern island of Mindanao and the Sulu archipelago. The Kapampangan Nasing Biringyi is related to the Malay Nasi Beriani, see Kapampangan cuisine.

In the southern island of Mindanao, biryani style rice dishes are served during big celebrations.

Thallapakatti Briyani

This variety of briyani is quite popular in south India particularly in Dindigul, Tamil Nadu.There are quite a number of eateries serving this type of briyani. Thallapakatti literally means turban in Tamil.

Dindigul Biriyani
Originating around Dindigul in Tamil Nadu, India is prepared using a small rice called seeraga samba and with special ingredients.

Shrimp Biryani
Shrimp Biriyani ~ Also it called Baluchi Biryani.

This particular variation of Biryani brings out the tender and delicate flavor of shrimp. Unlike other kinds of biryanis, it’s quicker to prepare and does not require long hours of complex marinating procedures. It’s usually served with a side of baingan masaledar.

Fish Biryani

The Fish Biryani is has same spices as Sindhi Biryani or Shrimp Biryani and uses different varieties of fish instead of shrimp,beef, mutton of chicken. In Europe and North America, salmon is the most popular fish used in Fish Biryani. It is also known as fish khichdi in Britain.

Daal Biryani

The Daal Biryani is offers the addition of Daal to the ingredients of vegetable biryani. Addition of daal along with basmati rice, colorful vegetables, spices and fragrance enhances nutritional value to make it a sumptuous dish.
Other Types

Bangladeshi home-made beef biryani

Iraqi Biryani (as served in Amman,Jordan)

A Pakistani version of the Bombay biryani.

Sri Lankan Chicken Biryani

Chicken Dum Biryani

Sindhi biryani from Pakistan

Iranian Biryani’s (Isfahan)

A dish of Burmese biryani (locally known as danpauk),
as served at Kyet Shar Soon in Yangon, Myanmar

Nasi Biryani sold in Bukit Batok,Singapore

A fish biryani cooked in Pakistani style

Essentials of a Parsi Kitchen

Essentials of a parsi kitchen

Ginger Garlic Paste

  • 1 cup of peeled and washed ginger, garlic and green chillies. (Equal amount ratio)
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1 tsp cumin seeds
  • Grind to a paste
  • Store in glass jar for use in refrigerator

Green Chillies

Fresh Green Chiilies Being Chopped
Fresh Green Chiilies Being Chopped

Hindi Name: Hari Mirch

A spice without which Indian cuisine would be incomplete, the most common variety of chilli used apart from red is the green. These are used with or without the stalks, whole or chopped, with seeds or deseeded. They are used fresh, dried, powdered, pickled or in sauces.

Though not used in excess just a touch of green chilli is enough to make the dish spicy. Green chilli usually blended with ginger and garlic, is very popularly used as masala in Indian household.

Usage

Savory dishes find the most use of green chillies in curries, breads, meat dishes and stir fries. Tempering or tadka used in a variety of dishes is incomplete without green chillies. A spice mix called green seasoning added to curries uses green chillies along with a tweaked salsa recipe.

Note: Always choose crisp, green, unwrinkled chilli. If you’re looking for only a hint of chilli, add deseeded. Be careful while using the seeds, they can cause a burning sensation if hands are not washed properly.

Nutritional Value

With a spicy bite, these fresh products are high in vitamins A and C.
Green chillies are high in potassium and iron content.

Did you know?

Contrary to the popular practice, water doesn’t relieve the burning sensation of green chilli, milk or milk based products do.

Red Chilli

Red chilli pepper
Red chilli pepper

Hindi Name: Lal Mirch

Dried red pepper may be used whole or powdered. India is the largest producer of red chillies. As the name suggests it is red in color and can be consumed as it is or can be broken down and made into a powder. It is really spicy and the intense heat is concentrated in the seeds. Fresh red chillies are milder.

Usage

Red chili’s are usually grounded into a powder and used as a spice. Red chili’s are dried or pickled in order to store them for a long period of time. It is a popular ingredient in most Indian dishes and curries.

Red chili’s are also used extensively for making sauces which are used to add spice to other dishes.

Is it beneficial?

They are an excellent source of vitamin C but excess use of red chillies may cause indigestion and heartburn. Capsaisin, the chemical that makes chillies hot is known to reduce the risk of skin and stomach cancer. They contain more vitamin C than an orange. It also acts as a remedy for cold and sinus symptoms. It does not contain any cholesterol.

Caution

Red chili’s or red chili powder must be kept away from eyes, if comes in contact, it can even cause permanent damage and in some cases, even blindness.

Chili’s should not be consumed separately. The seeds of chili’s cause innumerable cuts on the tip of our tongue, it is these cuts which cause that burning sensation in the mouth.

Did you know?

The best relief from the burning sensation of chillies is drink milk or have a spoonful of yogurt. Drinking water only enhances the burning sensation!

“Scoville heat units” [SHU] is the measuring unit which measures the hotness of chili’s. A sweet bell pepper scores 0 on the Scoville scale, a jalapeno pepper scores around 2500-4000 units, and a Mexican chili called HABANEROS scores 200,000 to 500,000 units.

The Bhut Jolokia is the spiciest red chilli in world. It is grown in Assam and Nagaland.

A Chili is a fruit. It is legally a vegetable in the US but botanically it is a fruit.

Dhansak Masala (Spices for Dhansak)

by Niru Gupta

dhansak.masala_205

Dhansak masala might seem tedious at first glance but is totally worth the effort! It’s a popular dish of the Parsi Zoroastrian community and combines elements of Persian and Gujarati cuisine.

Ingredients

250 gm sabut dhania

125 gm jeera

125 gm sabut lal mirch

10 gm shahi jeera

10 gm mustard seeds

10 gm methi dana

10 gm phool pathar (also known ar kalpasi and dagad phool)

1/2 tsp sabut kali mirch

30 gm khus khus

30 gm dal chini

30 gm laung

30 gm tamal patta

30 gm badian

1/8 tsp mace (javitri)

1 nutmeg

Method

Grind all the ingredients together.

Store in an airtight container.

Zarin’s Secrets

 

Zarin’s Secrets, is a venture started by me through which I am trying to revive old Parsee recipes. I have with me, my grand mothers old recipes for Home Made Authentic Masalas as well as Bhakras , chutney for Patra ni Machi , Kolmi No Achchar, Gajar meva nu achchar, Kachi keri no Murabbo and Gor papri to name a few.

My aim is to keep adding to the repertoire…. In the Masalas,I sell parsee Dhana Jeeru masalas, parsee Sambhar masalas, Dhan saak Masalas and parsee Curry masalas. All masalas when sold are given along with a recipe of the dish whose masalas you have bought. The idea is to make easy parsee cooking even easier and take it straight to your kitchen.

Please do check out my page on Facebook Zarin’s Secrets and contact me if interested.

Thank you
Shelley Subawalla

Saffron Crocus sativus

Saffron

safforn

Before using in cooking, soak the saffron strands in a teaspoon of warm water or milk.

Crush tenderly to release the flavor from the strands.

Use very little, 5 strands are enough for 1 cup of rice.

Too much saffron makes the food (pulao) very pungent.

How to grow Saffron:

Saffron is harvested from a flower.

Make sure you plant only the species: Saffron Crocus Sativus

Saffron Crocus sativus
Saffron Crocus sativus

Crocus sativus2.

The reddish-golden stamens of the flower is your saffron strands.

Dry them carefully so they won’t blow away in the wind.